October, 2020 Archive

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We must call Trump out on his many lies

first_imgBeing a snowflake, I was indeed offended by someone who represents me and speaks for me on the international stage calling other nations sh–holes.” However, if Mr. Weidman thinks me too weak to handle such things, let’s discuss statements Donald Trump made at the economic summit in Davos on the day Mr. Weidman’s letter was published.Mr. Trump asserted that 2.4 million jobs were added to the economy in the 14 months since he was elected. He left out that 2.8 million were created in the 14 months before he was elected, or that the number of jobs created since he took office is 1.8 million. He also left out the governing reality that in the first year of office, the president has very little impact on job growth or decline. So, for someone who wants consistently degrades the Obama presidency, he certainly has no problem taking credit for its accomplishments. Similarly, he seems to take credit for the lowering rates of unemployment among woman and minorities, when those rates have been going down for years. In other words, President Trump is full of exactly what he called those countries.This is the core of how President Trump is most offensive. He doesn’t tell the truth. The New York Times has verified more than 2,000 lies since he took office. Americans have become a cynical lot. We expect politicians to spin or engage in one type of subterfuge or another. However, this president tells outright lies several times a day, and they are easily caught and proven false. Yet, his supporters call it “talking straight.” I call it once again lowering our expectations for the people to whom we are entrusting our lives and the lives of our children.James Cimino Jr.SchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Schenectady police reform sessions pivot to onlineEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsSchenectady department heads: Budget cutbacks would further stress already-stretched departmentsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the census Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionI read Ray Weidman’s Jan. 26 letter asserting that “liberals” are too soft for our straight-talking president’s language as “a bit much for the snowflake PC crowd.” last_img read more

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Only recourse: Pray we don’t get shot

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionI’m haunted by a mental image. A woman running for her life, arms raised in a desperate, but futile, attempt to shield her body. A projectile strikes the flesh of her forearm then tears into her chest. The projectile, a .223 caliber bullet, accelerated to about 3,000 feet per second upon leaving a rifle 500 yards away. It slowed by the time it reached her, but still had sufficient kinetic energy to easily kill. This woman probably died within two minutes of being shot. She was one of 58 people murdered that evening. Eighteen were shot in the head and died instantly.  The instrument of her death, an AR-15 type assault rifle, was purposely designed to efficiently and quickly kill human beings. The gun can be fired rapidly from the shoulder or hip with little recoil and can support a high-capacity magazine.  Each fired round hits with devastating destructive force due to its very high velocity. The AR-15 earned the tag line “one shot one kill.” It first proved its effectiveness in the jungles of Vietnam, and now, sadly, in schools and other places where humans gather.The refusal by many to consider even modest gun control, coupled with a gun lobby that plies our government representatives with millions in campaign contributions, suggests we should expect more mass shootings. Further, data suggests we can expect increases in occurrence and numbers killed as well. Regrettably, our only recourse is to hope and pray that the bullets do not find us or those we love.Larry JordanAmsterdamMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsThree seniors who started as seventh-graders providing veteran experience for Amsterdam golfFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censuslast_img read more

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Was everything bad about casino factual?

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion I just read the June 4 letter by Mr. Mohamed Hafez [“Casino has proven supporters wrong”] on the editorial page, and I must say you are one bundle of information. Congratulations. Now, I have never been one to dispute actual facts. But is what you are saying all facts or is most of it second-hand hearsay? Do you go around the neighborhood asking people about their car insurance? Do you ask to see the books from Proctors? Is the city budget really in trouble because of the casino? Are you keeping track of all police calls? How many fights, recorded or otherwise, has any one really seen? I have been in and out of that casino many times, and I can honestly say I have never seen any thing close to muggings. I’m not quite sure what you mean by addiction, dope and gambling.If that was the case, you would have to shut down every casino in existence. But any way Mr. Hafez, you could be right on all counts.           Ron CapulloRotterdam   More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusRotterdam convenience store operator feels results of having Stewart’s as new neighborEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Car hits garage in Rotterdam Sunday morning; Garage, car burnlast_img read more

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Letters to the Editor for Monday, Jan. 20

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionCouncil also needs diversity of thoughtAfter reading the story of the Jan. 13 Schenectady City Council meeting, I have some concerns.The majority of the 2020 council seem to like using the word “diverse” to describe the current panel’s makeup. But it appears in their minds that word only constitutes color of skin and gender. And if that were the only components of this word, I would tend to agree. But it’s far from that. Unfortunately, they seem to overlook another of many components of the word diverse, and one would include “of a different mind.”Some members openly admitted the main reason a very qualified and deserving member of the council, Marion Porterfield, was denied the council presidency was her support of a non-endorsed member of her party to run for a county office in November — a sad excuse for denial indeed. During this questionable reasoning, some council members also choose to shut down a member of the public. During the privilege of the floor, that person was offering objections to the council presidency appointment by stating public facts, not hearsay or rumor. Calling it a personal attack by a council member is a stretch at best, which is another sad and scary state of council affairs.I implore the majority of this city council to open up its minds and ears to real diversity, and not let this first city council meeting of the decade become the model for future meetings by blurring the lines of openness, transparency and diversity. It’s simply wrong.Vince RiggiSchenectadyObjection to Green Light reflects biasThe Jan. 15 Gazette editorial (“Green Light hinders law enforcement”) objecting to restrictions on data sharing in the Green Light driver’s license law reveals a disturbing belief degrading much of the current debate about immigration in this country.Whether or not one agrees with it, it is now the law of New York state that the records of undocumented immigrants applying for driver’s licenses are not available for search by law enforcement officers except under clearly stated conditions.Why would The Gazette editors object to requiring law enforcement agencies to certify agreement to comply with those conditions? The only plausible reason is that the editors, disagreeing with the law in the first place, don’t believe that it should be obeyed.That belief is based on the very ugly assumption that immigrants in a range of categories, not just those who are undocumented, do not deserve equal protection under the law because they are somehow other, alien.This is the unjust belief that justifies, in the view of some, the separation by federal officials of migrant children from parents, in violation of U.S. law.This is the belief that motivates our federal government to require people to wait in Mexico while they appeal for asylum in the United States, in blatant violation of international law. This belief is not only unlawful; it is also immoral in its tendency to dehumanize. It is sad to see The Gazette editors buying into it.Terry DiggorySaratoga SpringsThe writer is co-coordinator of the Saratoga Immigration Coalition.Look at who’s really looking out for usA letter my fellow squawkers: “How did that fox get in our henhouse,” squabbled all us chickens?Even before he entered, we were protesting his presence. Doesn’t he know this is our house and he is an interloper?He started by inferring to the farmers that we have to start producing as we promised when we know better.He exposed the faulty trade arrangement with our neighbors that the ‘Great Rooster’ gave us and replaced it with one that our neighbors (and I understand quite a few of you feather-brained colleagues) agree is better. How dare he. Admittedly, it has stopped our neighbors from trying to steal our eggs, but I’m sure somehow, someway, he’s going to benefit by it.However, we must also admit he has given us more comfort and food for our workers. But I bet it won’t last. Let’s face it, he’s just not one of us and he must go. Makes no difference if we legally, illegally or forcefully remove him, for the end justifies the means (as long as we win.)”Dr. Arthur SalvatoreMaltaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsGov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?last_img read more

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Offices

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Warsaw packed

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Big-name developers line up in east Manchester

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Birkby sharpens bid to take over Workspace

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Wireless technology: Cutting the wire

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Belgium says transparency explains high virus toll

first_img“In Europe, no country counts like the others. We have the most detailed method,” Health Minister Maggie De Block told the television news channel LN24.She said the ministry might in future adopt a way of counting that would let Belgium compare its results with other countries, but provided no details. ‘Social, ethical human tragedy’ Some doctors have complained that deaths caused by hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular pathologies and other causes have been lumped into the COVID-19 category, but Emmanuel Andre, a spokesman for national health authorities, insisted the broad Belgian method of counting “is necessary.”The virus specialist explained that “the accepted practice is to take suspected cases into account” when tracking the spread of an epidemic.COVID-19 deaths that were confirmed by a positive test have represented only around five percent of those reported by retirement homes up to now, but Andre said that increased testing in those facilities would push the rate much higher in coming days.It would also allow authorities to better measure the extent of COVID-19’s spread, he added. Sociologist Geoffrey Pleyers said “a social and ethical human tragedy” had played out “unseen, behind the walls” of retirement homes as Belgian officials focused on whether hospitals had intensive care capacity to deal with the pandemic.”What proportion of deaths could have been avoided if people had received hospital care” for other pathologies, Pleyers asked in commentary published by the newspaper Le Soir.The government plans to multiply by 10 the number of coronavirus tests provided to retirement homes.But the target of 210,000 kits “is not enough to test everyone,” said Vincent Fredericq, general secretary of Femarbel, the leading federation for the sector in French-speaking Belgium.He said it cared for 160,000 residents across the country and employed 110,000 staff who were also potential vectors of the virus.”In the Brussels region, 95 percent of the personnel use public transport, either the metro, trams or buses, which are unfortunately good places to become contaminated,” Fredericq noted. Belgian Prime Minister Sophie Wilmes had to explain why that was the case on Wednesday, and said the government “made the choice of full transparency when communicating deaths linked to COVID-19,” even if it resulted in “numbers that are sometimes overestimated.”Most official tallies probably reflect only a fraction of the actual number of infections, because many countries are testing only the most serious cases.Unlike some countries, Belgium takes fully into account the dramatic situation in retirement homes.In the country’s more than 1,500 such facilities, the numbers include deaths that are considered linked to the coronavirus even if it has not been proven by tests, a choice not taken by many others. Belgium now has the highest death rate from COVID-19 in the European Union but officials insist it is because they have been totally transparent with the data.With more than 11.5 million inhabitants, Belgium has more than 4,800 deaths and an average of around 419 per one million inhabitants, now ahead of Spain at 409 per one million, the second highest in the EU.Belgium’s neighbors Britain and France have averages of 202 and 274 per one million respectively, with total reported deaths on the order of 14,000 and 18,000 for populations that are six times bigger. Topics :last_img read more

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