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Efficiency Vermont helps homeowners and businesses with free flood repair assessments

first_imgEfficiency Vermont,Efficiency Vermont is working with contractors and community-based organizations to help residents and small businesses rebuild after Tropical Storm Irene.Free services from Efficiency Vermont for flood-damaged structures include:·         Free flood repair assessments and air sealing by certified contractors, including moisture assessments, blower-door tests to identify areas of air leakage, air sealing, combustion safety testing to determine carbon monoxide levels and recommendations for rebuilding safely and energy efficiently;·         Enhanced weatherization and appliances replacement for low-income Vermonters, in collaboration with local weatherization assistance programs;·         Special custom ‘Button Up’ workshops scheduled around the state, to help Vermonters rebuild safely and energy efficiently, in partnership with the Central Vermont Community Action Council (CVCAC);·         Incentives of up to $1,000 to help Vermonters replace and upgrade heating systems and hot water heaters, in cooperation with the Vermont Fuel Dealers Association; and·         Customized incentives for businesses on equipment replacement as well as structural repairs. In addition, Efficiency Vermont continues to offer residential incentives of $25 – $100 to assist with the purchase of energy efficient refrigerators, clothes washers and dehumidifiers.  ‘Vermonters have been doing a tremendous job recovering from Irene,’ said Jim Merriam, director of Efficiency Vermont. ‘Efficiency Vermont is here to help them do so in a way that helps meet immediate needs, while also strengthening our communities for the future.’To further help flood-damaged communities, Efficiency Vermont and CVCAC are offering a special version of the popular Button-Up Vermont do-it-yourself workshops in September and early October. These free workshops (dates and locations to be announced) will deal with drying walls and basements, addressing mold issues, and improving building and heating system efficiency.”VFDA members are busy fixing heating equipment that was damaged by the storm,” said Matt Cota, Executive Director of the Vermont Fuel Dealers Association. “In many instances, a new high efficiency system or hot water heater is a better choice than fixing what is currently in the basement. Thanks to these incentives, these systems will be a little easier to afford.”Efficiency Vermont assessments, air sealing and other measures are available for a limited time. Limited funding is available for the rebates that will be provided on a first-received basis. More information can be found by contacting Efficiency Vermont at 888-921-5990or www.efficiencyvermont.com/irene(link is external).Community leaders in flood-affected areas who want to schedule workshops are encouraged to contact Liz Schlegel of CVCAC at 802-477-5237 or lschlegel@cvcac.org(link sends e-mail).For more information about all of Efficiency Vermont’s services to help Vermonters with Tropical Storm Irene recovery, visit www.efficiencyvermont.com/irene(link is external), or call toll-free 888-921-5990. Efficiency Vermont was created by the Vermont Legislature and the Vermont Public Service Board to help all Vermonters reduce energy costs, strengthen the economy, and protect Vermont’s environment. Efficiency Vermont is currently operated by Vermont Energy Investment Corporation (VEIC), an independent organization under appointment to the Vermont Public Service Board. VEIC is a Vermont-based nonprofit organization founded in 1986. For more information, contact Efficiency Vermont at 888-921-5990 or visit www.efficiencyvermont.com(link is external).last_img read more

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Beer Guide: Best Summer Seasonals

first_imgHot weather, cold beer. Drink all summer long with these summer seasonals.Starr Hill Grateful Pale Ale Crozet, Va.Can you say citrus? Grateful is Starr Hill’s twist on the American Pale Ale, with the light body you’d expect, but a wallop of Chinook and Cascade hops for a kick of citrus aroma. Surprisingly, there isn’t much of the bitterness you might expect from that combo. And at just 4.7 percent, it’s totally sessionable on a hot day.starrhill.comWild Wolf Ginger LagerNellysford, Va.Like a lager on a hot day? Don’t be ashamed. Particularly not when that lager has ginger and citrus notes and an effervescent body like this one. Sexy.wildwolfbeer.com Hardywood Park Virginia BlackberryRichmond, Va.If you like a little sweetness in your beer, this one’s worth the wait (Virginia Blackberry doesn’t hit the taps until late summer). More than 1,000 pounds of Virginia-picked blackberries go into each batch.hardywood.com Three Brothers Brewing The Great OutdoorsHarrisonburg, Va.Three Brothers bucks the trend of overly-hoppy pale ales by creating The Great Outdoors, a more mellow, sessionable pale ale designed with thirsty mountain bikers in mind.threebrosbrew.com DC Brau El Hefe SpeaksWashington D.C.This light, aromatic beer hits the classic hefeweizen high notes, offering a hint of banana and a creamy finish thanks to the heavy carbonation.dcbrau.com Pisgah Brewing Blueberry WheatBlack Mountain, N.C.The blueberry is just present enough to justify the name of this refreshing wheat beer. Consider this the fruit beer for people who don’t like fruit beer.pisgahbrewing.comThe Wedge WitbierAsheville, N.C.No tricks, no twists, just a shining example of a traditional witbier with coriander and orange peel spices, made for drinking by the river on a hot summer day—a perfect reason why the Wedge sits on the French Broad.wedgebrewing.com Chattanooga Brewing Company Imperial PilsnerChattanooga, Tenn.CBC’s flagship Imperial Pilsner is a bit hoppier than the pilsners you might be used to, but it’s still light and supremely drinkable. Technically, it’s not a seasonal, but it drinks like one on a hot summer day after a Tennessee River session.chattabrew.comOlde Mecklenburg Brewery Rein Pale AleCharlotte, N.C.Don’t look for fruit or additives in any OMB beer. They use nothing but water, malt, hops, and yeast. The result with the Rein is a low-hopped, crisp pale ale made for hot N.C. summer days.oldemeckbrew.com Fullsteam Brewery Cackalacky Ginger Pale AleDurham, N.C.It’s a brand new year-round offering from one of the most progressive breweries in the South, and it uses Chapel Hill’s Cackalacky hot sauce. Expect a supremely drinkable, and supremely North Carolina, pale ale.fullsteam.agCheck out the rest of our Southern Brew Guide!last_img read more

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What’s the average age of your board of directors?

first_imgI just found out that the National Youth Involvement Board was chartered in 1967 to address the aging of credit unions members, and yet the average age of a CU member is 47. The average age of all Americans is 37.8 years old. What’s the average age of your members and what is the average age of your board of directors? I recently had a conversation with a credit union that had just completed a year long rebranding with a fresh new look and snappy tagline that will insure they look and appeal to a “younger crowd.” I was walking through the office when I noticed the latest edition of their newsletter. Hmmm…I thought, I can’t believe they are still spending money (and by the looks of the quality, lots of money) on a paper newsletter. So I inquired. The answer? The board likes it. And here’s where it gets interesting. The board of directors are all largely retired from the original core group. Even though the field of membership has expanded to a community charter and the rebrand is necessary to show the desired target audience that they are welcome, there are those little things we just can’t let go of, because the (old) board members like it. Another great example? Old people checking. Do you still offer that? And does it include “free checks” that your board members love? If your target audience is the Millennial, why would you even still offer (aka target) the member that still writes checks? And last I checked because of supply and demand, check printing has gotten super expensive. Almost punitive in its pricing. If the credit union movement was a car it would definitely be a Buick. Remember those ads when Buick was trying to shed their image of only appealing to old people that could barely see over the steering wheel, driving slightly under the speed limit on the Interstate, with their AAA sticker on the bumper and their turn signal perpetually on? They launched a campaign with the tagline “This is not your grandfather’s Buick.” Highlighting, of course, the old stodgy image of the brand.  That’s what it feels like when I see a hip new website with “wealth management” and “Horizon checking” still prominently displayed. We’re a shiny new 2017 Buick. Incidentally the average age of a Buick owner went down to 57 from 64 after they launched this campaign and made their cars not so ugly.  So there’s that. I know it’s hard to recruit young board members, because the average age of your membership is so old so there just aren’t that many of them. And maybe it’s the nature of the beast. The subject of paying the board came up at a recent CUNA roundtable. Typically we have “paid” the board with a conference to an exotic location each year or some really great dinners with some really great wine. Most Millennials are working, raising a family and don’t have the time or see the value in volunteering to run a financial cooperative so they can spend an evening a month away from their family. Much less take a week of their precious paid vacation to attend a conference. I think a paid board of directors might be the answer to recruiting younger people. To be fair to our members, it shouldn’t be an exorbitant amount, since it’s their money we would use to pay them. Does it impact one of our big differentiators? A volunteer board of directors elected by the membership? A little. They would still be elected by the membership, but imagine if we had some new blood to help show us the way out of our Buick brand and into a bright, new younger future? 46SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Denise Wymore Denise started her credit union career over 30 years ago as a Teller for Pacific NW Federal Credit Union in Portland, Oregon. She moved up and around the org. chart … Web: www.nacuso.org Detailslast_img read more

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KUH launched a project of certification and assistance in raising the quality of small camps in the Republic of Croatia

first_imgOver the past few years, we have witnessed a significant increase in the quality of Croatian camps, and it is especially important to emphasize that positive changes are noticeable in the sphere of small camps, mostly family-run, both on the coast and in the continental part of Croatia. All additional information about the project, as well as the application form, can be downloaded HERE. The project was launched in 2010 in conditions when there was a need to isolate the best cases from practice in order to raise quality and better positioning, recognition and promotion, then still few, quality small camps. Looking back, today it can be confirmed that in this nine-year period the basic long-term goal of the project has been achieved, which is to build a strong and recognizable network of the highest quality small camps as an important part of Croatia’s tourist offer. It is important to emphasize that in parallel with the increase in the quality of content and services of existing small camps, the trend of opening new small camps is noticed, which from the very beginning try to provide more than what is prescribed by the ordinance. It is especially interesting that in the last few years more continental camps than “sea” ones have been included in the list of camps marked “OK Mini Camps”. This year, 2019, with the support of the Ministry of Tourism of the Republic of Croatia, a new round of certification of the quality of small camps is carried out, as part of the project “OK Mini Camps”, so the Croatian Camping Association invites all small camps, which believe that quality standards and expectations of modern campers, to apply for participation in the project and thus use the opportunity for more successful advertising, positioning and recognition, greater capacity utilization, recommendation, education and investment guidelines and exchange of experiences. What is it all about? “OK Mini Camps” is a project by which KUH defines, visits, educates, analyzes and evaluates the quality standards of small camps with a maximum capacity of up to 200 people, so that in the end the selected camps are awarded the quality label “OK Mini Camps”. The label is currently carried by a total of 41 best small campsites in Croatia, and serves as an element of differentiation in quality compared to other small campsites, while presenting and providing quality assurance to guests.center_img It is dedicated to selected camps, which stand out for their quality WEB SECTION as part of the main Croatian camping PORTAL, and included additional promotional activities such as, for example, brochure printing, joint exhibition at fairs and the like. Today, small camps are reaping their share of the tourist cake with original and quality contents and services, as well as carefully thought-out and correctly dosed promotional activities, while the Croatian Camping Association (KUH), which has been cooperating with The Ministry of Tourism is implementing the “OK Mini Camps” project. Photo: Croatian Camping Unionlast_img read more

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Governor Wolf Announces Funding for State-of-the-Art Cardiac Catheterization Lab at PennState Health Saint Joseph in Berks County

first_imgGovernor Wolf Announces Funding for State-of-the-Art Cardiac Catheterization Lab at PennState Health Saint Joseph in Berks County August 16, 2018 Infrastructure,  Innovation,  Press Release,  Public Health Harrisburg, PA – Today, Governor Tom Wolf announced new funding that will increase the quality of care for cardiac patients at PennState Health Saint Joseph, Berks County, by creating a hybrid cardiac catheterization lab with state-of-the-art technology.“There are few responsibilities more important than the health of our communities and PennState Health’s new lab will help ensure citizens in Berks County and the surrounding areas have access to the most modern cardiac care,” Governor Wolf said. “I thank Sen. Schwank for her efforts to work with my administration to ensure healthier communities across Pennsylvania.”The Pennsylvania State University was named as the recipient of a $1 million grant supporting a five-phase project reconfiguring four existing cardiac catheterization labs and electrophysiology lab to create two new hybrid catheterization labs and modernize the electrophysiology lab and two cardiac catheterization labs.“The PennState Health Cardiac Catheterization lab is a huge project in our community, one that will take several years, but drastically improve the quality of health care available in Berks County and also yield very high-level employment,” said Senator Judy Schwank. “I am proud to support their work, and see this money come to my district.”The grant supports the first phase, which will update outdated equipment and reconfigure infrastructure to create a hybrid cardiac catheterization lab with the equipment necessary to provide patients interventional radiology procedures and advanced oncological procedures. The innovative technology will allow patients in Berks County to obtain cutting-edge care locally, enhancing the overall wellness of the community. This phase of the project is also anticipated to create six new positions dedicated to supporting the hybrid lab.Supported through the Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program (RACP) program, funding will support critical expansion projects, some of which will provide opportunities for additional economic development.center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Governor Wolf: Tyber Medical Expansion Will Support Nearly 80 Jobs in Northampton County

first_img Infrastructure,  Jobs That Pay,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Today, Governor Tom Wolf announced that Tyber Medical LLC, an orthopedic device manufacturer, will expand its manufacturing operation in Hanover Township, Northampton County. The project will support the combined creation and retention of 79 jobs in the area.“Tyber Medical’s expansion project is so important because not only does it provide good-paying, family-sustaining jobs for Lehigh Valley families, but also because it contributes to building Pennsylvania’s entire manufacturing sector,” Governor Wolf said. “I applaud Tyber Medical for selecting Pennsylvania as the place to continue its growth in the years ahead.”Tyber Medical needs more manufacturing space to sustain and continue its growth. The project includes expansion into a 35,000 square-foot building adjacent to their current facility, which also will be renovated. Additionally, funding will support the purchase of new equipment and job training for new and existing employees. The company plans to invest $3.8 million into the project, which is expected to create 44 new, full-time jobs and retain 35 existing jobs over the next three years.“We are excited to have the continued support of Governor Wolf and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to expand our headquarters to accommodate the company’s rapid growth and future plans,” said Jeff Tyber, president and CEO of Tyber Medical. “Our focus to excellence within the orthopedic device industry has yielded extraordinary growth that we are meeting by attracting talent throughout the Lehigh Valley area.”Tyber Medical received a funding proposal from the Department of Community and Economic Development for the project. The proposal includes a $100,000 Pennsylvania First grant, $132,000 in Job Creation Tax Credits to be distributed upon creation of the new jobs, and $37,400 in funding to assist with workforce training. The company also was encouraged to apply for a $400,000 low-interest loan through the Pennsylvania Industrial Development Authority. The project was coordinated by the Governor’s Action Team, an experienced group of economic development professionals who report directly to the Governor and work with businesses that are considering locating or expanding in Pennsylvania.This project builds on the continued success of the company’s original relocation into Pennsylvania from New Jersey in 2015, a project that was also supported by the Governor’s Action Team at that time. Since that relocation, the company has grown from a few employees to 35 employees with an average annual salary over $100,000 and now requires additional space to continue to hire additional employees. Tyber Medical has been a significant contributor to manufacturing in the Lehigh Valley, and this project ensures that the company remains in Pennsylvania for the foreseeable future.Tyber Medical LLC is an orthopedic device manufacturer addressing the industry’s need for rapid access to regulatory cleared systems in the spine, trauma, and distal extremity markets. Focused on rapid commercialization and bioengineering technology, Tyber has released 14 spine and 25 trauma/extremity systems since its founding in 2012.For more information about the Governor’s Action Team or DCED, visit dced.pa.gov. Governor Wolf: Tyber Medical Expansion Will Support Nearly 80 Jobs in Northampton County June 05, 2019center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Noble Corp. eyes increase in offshore drilling activity despite 3Q loss

first_imgSimilar to its rival Rowan, which is expected to be acquired by Ensco, offshore driller Noble Corporation is seeing an increase in offshore drilling activity despite recording a loss for the third quarter of the year. Noble Sam Turner jack-up; Source: Flickr; Author: SP MacNoble Corp. on Wednesday reported a net loss attributable to the company for the three months ended September 30, 2018 of $82 million on revenues of $279 million. This compares to a net loss of $96.79 million and revenues of $266.2 million in the same period last year.Results for the third quarter 2018 included a discrete tax benefit totaling $25 million. Excluding the impact of the discrete tax benefit, the company would have reported a net loss attributable to Noble Corporation of $107 million.Julie J. Robertson, Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Noble Corporation, stated, “Third quarter results gave convincing evidence of strengthening in the offshore drilling business and demonstrated how Noble is realizing measurable gains from the cyclical improvement.“Across our fleet, operating days advanced 12 percent when compared to the second quarter, due primarily to higher activity among our premium jack-ups concentrated in the increasingly active North Sea and Middle East regions. Consequently, total revenues improved eight percent over the prior quarter, continuing the favorable trend through 2018, with third quarter revenues exceeding those reported for the first quarter of the year by almost 20 percent.”Noble’s contract drilling services revenues totaled $267 million in the third quarter, representing an eight percent increase when compared to revenues of $248 million in the preceding quarter.Total fleet utilization in the third quarter improved to 69 percent, up from 54 percent in the preceding quarter, and up from 60 percent in 3Q 2017, with the higher result due to the improvement in fleet operating days and the retirement and divestiture of four rigs during the second quarter of 2018.Contract drilling services costs in the third quarter totaled $163 million compared to $151 million in the preceding quarter. ‘A meaningful increase’  Robertson noted, “It is apparent that a meaningful increase in drilling activity has begun, as customers increasingly recognize the compelling economics inherent in their offshore project portfolios. As more of these projects transition from an evaluation phase to full execution, and additional access is granted to promising offshore basins, we believe higher fleet utilization industry-wide is likely, especially for high-specification rigs.She added: “Recent contract awards across the Noble fleet, including those for the drillships Noble Globetrotter II, Noble Tom Madden and Noble Sam Croft, and the recent purchase and concurrent three-year award for the jack-up Noble Johnny Whitstine, give evidence of a more fundamentally sound environment while serving to strengthen Noble’s competitive position as we enter 2019.”Namely, Noble secured contracts for the drillship Noble Sam Croft for operations in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, and for the drillship Noble Globetrotter II for operations in the Black Sea. In addition to the contract dayrate for the Black Sea program, the Noble Globetrotter II will continue to collect an idle period rate of $185,000.It is also worth noting that, at the end of September 2018, the company’s contract backlog totaled $2.5 billion, including $1.5 billion attributable to the floating fleet and $1 billion to the jack-up fleet.Offshore Energy Today Stafflast_img read more

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Violet Mae ‘Toots’ Reynolds

first_imgViolet Mae Reynolds, age 77 of Batesville, Indiana passed away on Saturday, May 19, 2018 at her home.  The daughter of Sidney K. and Sally Powell was born in Garrard County, Kentucky on March 31, 1941.Violet married Dallas Reynolds on July 24, 1984 in Florence, KY.  Though her given name was Violet, many of her family and friends affectionately knew her as ‘Toots’.  She worked for the Interior Department of Batesville Casket Company before eventually retiring from there.Violet loved music and sang with ‘The Powell Family Singers’ for many years.  She also enjoyed cooking, especially ‘Lizzy Beans’ (a family casserole dish), along with chicken and dumplings.  Later in life Violet liked going out to eat with family and watching Dr. Phil and Dancing with the Stars.  Most of all she loved spending time with her family, as her grandchildren and great grandchildren were especially dear to her.She is survived by her daughter, Michele (Rob) Lattire of Sunman, Danielle Reynolds of Batesville, Step-son Todd (Annette) Reynolds of Greenfield, IN, step-daughters, Robin Sizemore of Batesville and Beth Reynolds of North Vernon, IN; 6 grandchildren and 3 great grandchildren; in addition to her siblings Margaret Perry, Helen (Charlie) Yorn of Batesville, Carter Powell of Morris, Joe Powell of Batesville, James (Cookie) Powell of Sunman, Junior (Lil) Powell of Batesville and Ernie (Hilda) Powell of Morris, Elmer (Lois) Powell of Osgood, sister-law Mary Powell of Mulberry, FL.In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband Dallas and her brother Shelton Powell.Visitation will be Wednesday from 4-7pm with Funeral Services at 10am on Thursday, May 24, 2018 all at Meyers Funeral Home in Batesville.  Burial will follow in the Batesville United Methodist Cemetery.  Pastor Elby Harrison officiating.Memorials may be given to the funeral home to assist the family with funeral expenses. Online condolences at www.meyersfuneralhomes.com.last_img read more

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Stipends problematic for collegiate athletes

first_imgNobody cares about Lonnie White. Nobody cares that as a former USC wide receiver from 1982 to 1986, White pocketed roughly $14,000 in extra benefits. Nobody cares that he sold his season ticket allotment. Nobody cares that, in doing so, he violated NCAA rules.We’re numb to this now. Unless Yahoo! Sports were to learn Pat Haden, Lane Kiffin and Matt Barkley were operating some drug cartel south of the border, most of us are going to shrug our shoulders and just trot along.We have read about extra benefits for months now. We have read about impermissible contact with agents, sports marketers, boosters, alleged boosters and runners. It’s quite the list.Thus, White’s revelation of his prior transgressions in The Daily last week didn’t exactly move the needle much when it comes to such issues.“Rent was overdue and my household bills were delinquent,” White wrote. “I needed the money to live, so accepting the $14,000 in different forms of ‘benefits’ over my college years three decades ago was an act of survival.”But glancing over this would be unfortunate.In the aftermath of scandals this past year at USC, North Carolina, Auburn and Ohio State, the issue of providing college athletes with greater compensation has reared its head yet again.Highlighting a national discussion, namely in recent months, has been whether student-athletes, primarily those who happen to play football, should be paid. How much? How often? When? And from whom?It’s far-fetched from a number of perspectives, at least in regard to some sort of full-scale payroll handed down from athletic departments to players.Despite such complications, it’s not a moot point. The idea of increasing the player stipend, in the hopes of preventing players such as White from having similar problems in regard to rent payments remains the most practical option available. It’s an idea, at least, that USC Athletic Director Pat Haden seemingly gave a full endorsement in the wake of White’s revelation.“The NCAA formulas used to determine student-athlete stipends are not appropriate,” Haden said in a statement. “Having interviewed 15 different athletes and broken down their stipend against their bills, they are left with about $5 per day for food.  I just do not think that is right.”And as Haden points out, USC athletes, by virtue of living in Los Angeles in a Downtown urban sprawl, carry a heavier burden than most.“The current formula does not take into account the different costs associated with going to USC and living in Los Angeles as opposed to Washington State and a small town like Pullman,” Haden said.Typically, athletic scholarships cover tuition, which at USC is roughly $37,000 per year, but they do not, however, cover the cost of living, room and board, meals, etc., which is where stipends come in.According to Haden, athletes living in non-university housing receive $1,100 monthly, which doesn’t necessarily equate to much once you factor in rent charges of nearly $900 per month.Then again, would raising the stipend actually serve as a deterrent for players faced with predicaments similar to White’s from accepting extra benefits?Would an extra $300 per month prohibit individuals, such as former Ohio State quarterback Terrelle Pryor, from selling signed merchandise for thousands of dollars?In all likelihood, no.But it would, unquestionably, alleviate some of the pressures placed upon student-athletes, which still makes it an attractive option.Granted, it would hardly eliminate wide-spread situations such as those similar to Terrelle Pryor and Ohio State, but it would be particularly beneficial to those such as White.So what’s the hold up? The short answer: Lack of funds. The longer answer: Title IX.Enacted in 1972 as an amendment to the 1964 Civil Rights Act, Title IX forbids discrimination on the basis of sex at schools that receive federal aid. It covers medical schools, law schools and, most notably, athletic programs despite no explicit mention of sports in its wording.In particular, it stresses proportionality, which says the number of athletes from each sex should be equivalent to the school’s enrollment percentages. Therefore, if half of a school’s student body is made up of women, then half of its athletes should be women as well.Thus, stipends must be proportionate as well.USC, among other schools across the country, would be restricted from solely subsiding stipends for football players. It would need to cover all sports, from football, to men’s basketball, to women’s rowing.That might be more money than most schools are capable of paying.It’s certainly an issue that needs to be fixed — if only it wasn’t a logistical nightmare. “The 19th Hole” ran every other Wednesday. To comment on this article, email Joey at jrkaufma@usc.edu or visit dailytrojan.com.last_img read more

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“Fire Lane” movement brings out fans’ worst

first_img“Inside the 20s” runs on Tuesdays. To comment on this story, email Nick at nselbe@usc.edu or visit dailytrojan.com. Follow Nick on Twitter @NickSelbe It couldn’t be ignored.Most of the time, when the home team suffers an upset loss, they say you can hear a pin drop in the stands because the crowd is in such stunned silence.Poor taste · Flyers advocating for USC head coach Lane Kiffin’s dismissal paint an unflattering picture of fans’ and students’ loyalty. – Nick Selbe | Daily TrojanWhen the clock struck zero on Saturday night at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, however, this was not the case. If a pin did in fact drop, no one heard it. No one could hear much of anything, really, except for the deafening chant:“Fire Kiffin! Fire Kiffin!”It rang throughout the entire stadium as Lane Kiffin’s Trojans stunningly, embarrassingly and, for the most part, lifelessly fell at the hands of Washington State. People outside the stadium could hear it. Those watching on television or listening on the radio could hear it. USC players heard it.And Kiffin himself definitely heard it.After the loss, Kiffin joked that the chants and the boos were beneficial in that they helped his team get used to playing on the road. Could you blame him if the sound of 70,000 people passionately voicing their disapproval of his job performance didn’t quite feel like home?Or how about the fact that the morning after the loss, the USC campus was plastered with fliers that read “No Parking: Fire Lane”? And that those fliers even made their way onto Tommy Trojan, the most sacred of all USC landmarks?Would that feel like home to you?Kiffin and his team, particularly his offense, which performed woefully against a less-than-stellar Cougars defense, have a lot to answer for and even more to improve upon. I find it extremely unlikely that USC can win a game, much less keep a game close for that matter, if the offense fails as miserably as it did on Saturday night again this season.Kiffin’s playcalling was questionable, and who knows if his reluctance to pick a starting quarterback and stick with him factored into the offense’s ineptitude.But that’s a discussion for another time.What’s so disheartening about the chants and the fliers is that, to some degree at least, USC students are responsible for them. I am not saying that students started the chants or posted the fliers, because I do not know that to be true. But some students, at least, participated in the chants. And it would take much more of a commitment to print out hundreds of copies of fliers at home and drive to USC than it would to stroll out of your dorm room and make copies at Doheny.Nevertheless, however many students were behind the #FireKiffin movement, it’s too many.As Trojans, we’re easy targets. Either we go to the University of Spoiled Children, have a condom brand as our mascot or we have the most corrupt athletic program in the history of college sports. When it comes to insults, we’ve heard ‘em all.But through all the taunts, we keep our heads up. We explain that, no, we’re not holding up two fingers because we’re second best, or because we’re part of a Vietnam War protest. We do it as a “V” for victory. Because, when adversity hits, we Fight On.Or at least we’re supposed to.With all the vitriol being launched Kiffin’s way, though, I’m starting to wonder if “Fight On” is actually our credo or just something we say or put on a T-shirt. For better or worse, Lane Kiffin is our head coach. He is a Trojan. Even if he were the worst playcaller in the history of college football, nobody deserves that kind of treatment, and certainly not from his own team’s fans.I like to think of myself as a positive person, but even I had nothing good to say after Saturday’s game. That’s how bad the Trojans were, and that is a reflection of the head coach. Losing to Washington State at home is unacceptable, and I understand the students’ and fans’ frustrations. Those who believe he should be fired are absolutely entitled to think that way.But no one deserves to be called out, literally, the way Kiffin has been these past few days. And I realize that I’ve said some pretty sappy things in this column (“When adversity hits, we Fight On”? Come on), but seeing “Fire Lane” fliers defacing Tommy Trojan and hearing the Coliseum crowd turn on its team’s leader just really gets under my skin.Saturday’s game was my first time as a student not watching a home game from the student section. As the team took the field for the first time, I watched from the press box and wished I could transport myself to Section 25 and be a part of the rowdy group.As the game ended, though, and the chants began, for once I was thankful to be clear on the other side of the stadium.last_img read more

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