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Some Governors Worry That Federal Aid Is Too Restrictive

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) MGN Stock ImageWASHINGTON – Governors in a handful of states are raising concerns about restrictions on the federal stimulus checks they have started to receive to help cover the costs of combating the coronavirus.New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy, a Democrat whose state has had nearly 100,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases, the second-most in the country, said Thursday that much of the $1.8 billion heading there is “unusable” and might have to be returned to the U.S. Treasury. Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee, a Republican, made similar comments the day before.Those doubts come even as states are expecting tax revenue to crater, leading to layoffs and budget cuts.The $150 billion in aid to state and local governments is part of the $2.2 trillion relief bill passed by Congress last month. Every state is getting at least $1.2 billion, while the most populous cities and counties also receive a share. In guidance issued Wednesday, the Treasury Department told states that the money had to be used to deal with the medical emergency caused by the outbreak. It generally could not be used for expenses that were accounted for in budgets adopted by March 27.But the department did leave some wiggle room: First responders and other government employees “whose services are substantially dedicated to mitigating or responding to the COVID-19 public health emergency” can have their salaries paid with the aid from March through December, according to the guidance.Shelby Kerns, executive director of the National Association of State Budget Officers, said in an email that states are still reviewing the documents but that “we expect most to be able to use the full allotment.”Virginia Secretary of Finance Aubrey Layne said he was surprised at how restrictive Treasury’s rules for the state aid are and understands why governors wonder if they might have to return some of the money.“I’m going to try my best not to do that,” he said.The National Governors Association is pushing Congress to approve an additional $500 billion to replace state and local revenue that has evaporated amid the business closures and record job losses during the pandemic.last_img read more

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Everybody Say Cake! Kinky Boots Celebrates 500 Perfs

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on April 7, 2019 View Comments Andy Kelso Star Files Kinky Bootscenter_img Billy Porter Related Shows The sex is in the frosting! The Tony-winning hit musical Kinky Boots celebrated its 500th performance at the Al Hirschfeld Theatre on June 19. After their milestone bow, the cast of the Cyndi Lauper and Harvey Fierstein tuner gathered for cake and hugs. Check out this Hot Shot of stars Andy Kelso and Tony winner Billy Porter flanking their director/choreographer Jerry Mitchell. That cake looks pretty darn good, but then again…we have a thing for Broadway confections.last_img read more

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Photos! Kelly Clarkson Gets Jazzy with Jennifer Nettles at Chicago

first_img Related Shows Jennifer Nettles welcomed another Grammy winner to Cook County Jail on February 28, 2015—Kelly Clarkson! The singer-songwriter and American Idol winner stopped by to visit her pal Nettles, who is playing Roxie in the hit musical Chicago through March 29, and her co-star Carly Hughes, who plays Velma. Hey Kelly, when are you coming to Broadway? Check out these Hot Shots of Nettles, Clarkson and Hughes painting the town, then catch Chicago at the Ambassador Theatre on Broadway. from $49.50 View Comments Chicagolast_img read more

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Champlain College to hold open houses

first_imgOn Nov. 12 and Nov. 15, representatives from Champlain College will host open house sessions to view plans for a welcome center, residence halls and other campus expansion proposals in conjunction with its master plan. The sessions are open for neighbors and community members.In March 2007, Champlain completed its master plan with the vision to support future growth as a flexible, desirable, and attractive institution. This vision was designed with the goal not to negatively impact the residential or historic character, or the high quality of life on The Hill.Attendees are welcome to stop by on either day for any duration during the hours of 6 pm and 8 pm on Nov. 12 and 9 am and noon on Nov. 15.Located on campus in the Hauke Family Center Conference Room, representatives will be available with information and designs of the overall master plan, as well as the individual proposals. Other topics covered will be traffic, sustainability and neighborhood preservation.This event is free and open to the public.last_img read more

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Another Opponent to FirstEnergy Bailout

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Mark Reider for the Toledo Blade:The Northwest Ohio Aggregation Coalition, a local bulk power-buying group formed by 11 area communities, filed an objection Tuesday with federal regulators to block a pending rate hike by FirstEnergy Corp.The coalition submitted a petition with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to intervene and comment on the proposed increase that would guarantee profits over the next eight years at four power plants operated by FirstEnergy, the parent of Toledo Edison.The Lucas County commissioners said the purchase power agreement under review by the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio would equate to a $3.9 billion bailout for the utility and an unjust rate hike on businesses and residents.Tina Skeldon Wozniak, president of the commissioners, said the hike would cost $800 to $1,000 extra a year for families in northwest Ohio.“This bailout is not good for northwest Ohio. It is mostly good for one company,” she said at One Government Center.The increase would add a fee averaging about $3.25 on every residential customer’s bill for the first year of the plan to subsidize the four plants until such time as energy prices rise and the plants are profitable again. Then the fee would either remain on bills or turn into a credit if the plants begin to make money, the utility claims.Coalition files to block FirstEnergy rate increase Another Opponent to FirstEnergy Bailoutlast_img read more

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Meet the 2016-2017 Interns!

first_imgimg_5885Jess Wiegandt ibexAlexis EliotI grew up on a small farm in Ohio where being outside was a lifestyle, something I took for granted. My brother and I just didn’t have anything better to do. I would have never guessed back then that those early mornings spent crawling through the woods would propel me to become a major outdoor enthusiast. I thru-hiked the Appalachian Trail when I was eighteen. I was trying to create a precedent for my future choices, to set the bar high early and recognize what I expected of myself. I finished the AT in July and began studying Mechanical Engineering at Virginia Tech in August of the same year. As Head Trip Leader of the Virginia Tech Outdoor Club, I lead a lot of backpacking trips in the Blue Ridge Mountains and actively encourage new folks to try their hand in the great outdoors. fullsizerender-8Shannon LarkinMy name is Shannon Larkin and I’m a senior studying Business Management and English Literature at Virginia Tech. I grew up playing along the banks of the James River in Richmond, Va. Since then, I have fallen in love with the Blue Ridge Mountains while living in Blacksburg. My life in the mountains gives me easy access to some of the best hiking and snowboarding—my favorite ways to go outside and play—on the East Coast. After graduation I hope to find a job that allows me to travel, write, and be outdoors.  My life consists of romping around in the woods for class and fun. I am double majoring in Wilderness Leadership and Experiential Education (WLEE) and English at Brevard College. I’m originally from Roanoke, Va., and now study in Brevard, N.C. While my stomping grounds have changed, I still love getting outside whitewater kayaking, biking, climbing, and hiking. Bring trail mix on an adventure and we’ll be the best of friends. Find a Hellbender along the way and I’ll be impressed forever.center_img August marked the beginning of a new school year for thousands of college students across the country and for us, the beginning of our 2016-2017 B.R.O. College Ambassadorship.Meet the fresh meat of the magazine—you’ll be seeing them online and at events throughout the school year, so be sure to give them a fist bump or a bootie beer, whichever is more appropriate. elizabeth-mcintosh-pictureElizabeth McIntoshI hail from the aptly named town of Oakton, Va., (we’ve got a lot of trees for a suburban area). I’m a first year student at the University of Virginia and could not be happier about it. Although I am completely undecided about my major, UVA has a great liberal arts program that I’m taking full advantage of. My favorite place to be is outside, especially in the woods, and my favorite thing to do is walk, ideally through the woods. I cannot say I’m a very well-rounded outdoorswoman, so it is a goal of mine to expand my outdoors experience through a breadth of activities. A few of my other pastimes are reading, journaling, and spending quality time with my family. I’m thrilled to be able to work with a brand that will help me develop both my passions and professional skills.last_img read more

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Long Island Haunted Houses and Halloween Events 2015

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Summer is over, Long Island. Get over it. Now is the time to embrace your inner scare crow by enjoying Halloween all month long, not just on Oct. 31. Haunted houses full of ghosts, goblins and ghouls are creeping up across Long Island for a howling good time over the next month. The spooky events range from kid-friendly festivities for the whole family to the type of dark, twisted fright fests that scare the pants off supposedly grown adults—and plenty that fall in between.From local fire department fundraiser haunts to hardcore horror movie recreations—and even some loosely related events sprinkled throughout—here are more than three dozen Long Island haunted house event listings:New York Zombie ApocalypseLaser tag meets zombie apocalypse in this terrifying and unique interactive scare-attraction. 450 Commack Rd., Deer Park. nyzapocalypse.com $35-$40. Times vary, Thurs-Sun. Year round.Bayville Scream ParkWith five thrilling haunted attractions, a pumpkin bounce house, pumpkin patch and a spooky jungle tree, this is truly Long Island’s Halloween theme park. Bayville Adventure Park, 8 Bayville Ave., Bayville. bayvillescreampark.com $10.75-$49.75. Weekends through Oct. 4, Everyday Oct. 9 through Nov. 1, Nov. 6, 7.Happy HauntsFamily friendly frights, pumpkin decorating, aquarium shows and more. Adventureland Amusement Park, 2245 Route 110, Farmingdale. Adventureland.us. Free. Weekends through Nov. 1.The Addams Family: A New MusicalSee Morticia, Uncle Fester, Pugsley and Wednesday like you’ve never seen them before. SoLuna Studio, 659 Old Willets Path, Hauppauge. solunastudiony.com $15. Various dates and times through Nov. 1.Darkside Haunted HouseWalk through more than two-dozen movie-quality sets, experience bone-chilling special effects and heart-pounding scares. 5184 Route 25A, Wading River. darksideproductions.com $18-$23. 7-11 p.m. Mon.-Thurs., 7 p.m.-12 a.m. Fri., 7 p.m.-12 a.m. Sat., 6 p.m.-10 p.m. Sun. Through Nov. 1. Kid friendly 1 p.m.-5 p.m.From The Archives: Long Island Huants: 13 Creepiest Haunted Places on Long Island Haunted PlayhouseWhen they’re not performing in plays and musicals, the actors at this community theater are convincingly turning their venue into a “Playhouse of Horrors.” Gateway Playhouse, 215 South Country Rd., Bellport. gatewayshauntedplayhouse.com $25-$40. Days and times vary, through Oct. 31. Visit website for kid friendly dates.Haunted Mansion of MelvilleFor the past 20 years, this particularly disturbing haunted house has starred a deranged doctor seemingly cursed by a book inscribed with ancient texts. Are you brave enough to pay a visit to the good doctor? For a separate $11 fee, visitors can navigate a haunted nighttime corn maze and for $5 more, they can volunteer to be “test subjects” for the doctor’s creepy experiments. (Maybe we’ll pass on that one.) F&W Schmitt’s Family Farm, 26 Pinelawn Rd., Melville. schmittshaunt.com $5-$30. Days and times vary, through Oct. 31.Otto the GhostTake the kids on a hayride down a decorated trail, visit farm animals and hear the latest family friendly animated adventures of Otto the Ghost. Fresh-picked apples, apple cider and candied apples available, plus roasted corn and popcorn on weekends. Hicks Nursery, 100 Jericho Tpke., Westbury. Free. hicksnurseries.com 9 a.m.-4 p.m. through Nov. 1.Haunted TunnelThis 300-foot tunnel is full of (not too scary) exhibits. The kids will also love the balloon bounce, mining for gold exhibit and face-painting. Woodside Nursery & Garden Center, 134 E Woodside Ave., North Patchogue. woodsidenurseryandgarden.com Prices vary. Days and times vary. Through Oct. 31.Chamber of HorrorsThis year’s “Trilogy of Fear” features Maniac Manor, Toxic City and Witch Asylum, as well as special Family Days for the little ones. Trilogy of Fear-Final Night will be the scariest yet – a full contact extravaganza on Nov. 1 with no rules! However, anyone willing to be put through the gauntlet must be 18 or older. 1745 Express Drive North, Hauppauge. chamberofhorrorsny.com $15-$60. Days and times vary. Through Nov. 1.Psycho Haunted HouseSchedule an appointment with the creepy Dr. DeKay, visit his patients and view his experiments. North Patchogue Fire Department, 33 Davidson Ave., North Patchogue. hauntedhouse.northpatchoguefd.net $10. 6-11:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays through Oct. 31.14 Nights of FrightPrepare to be seriously scared. Farmingville Fire Department Stationhouse No. 2, 1080 Portion Rd., Farmingville. www.lifrighthouse.com $8. 6:30 p.m. Oct. 2-4, 10, 11, 16, 18, 23-25, Oct. 29-Nov. 1.Spooky HollowFor the kids not up for this haunted house, there is also Spookville and Spooky night hay ride. Wicks Farm, 445 New York 25A, St. James. 631-584-5727. Prices vary. $10 weekdays, $13 weekend days, $16 weekend nights. Through Oct 31.Nyctophobia Haunted HouseLeave the scaredy-cats at home. This immersive and interactive haunted experience takes place completely in the dark…Yikes! 1508 Main Rd., Jamesport. nyctophobiany.com $35. Oct. 3-4, 10-11, 17-18, 24-25 and 31.Rise of The Jack O’LanternsMore than 5,000 jack o’lanterns hand-carved by professional artists and sculptors arranged in artful displays throughout a scenic trail. Old Westbury Gardens, 71 Old Westbury Rd., Old Westbury, 516-252-1030. Advanced tickets required. therise.org Prices vary. Weekends Oct. 2-25, plus Oct. 15, 22.Restless Souls Long Haunted ChurchA haunted cemetery, church and a hair-raising trail through the woods. Not for the faint of heart! West Hills United Methodist Church 301 West Hills Rd., Huntington Station. restlesssoulshauntedchurch.webs.com $10 haunted house. $5 haunted trail. $12 both. 6-10 p.m. Fri. and Sat. 5-9 p.m. Sun. Oct. 9, 10, 16-18, 23-25, 30, 31.Yaphank Trail of TerrorA fright fest of epic proportions capped off with a creepy haunted maze. Afterward, cozy up to the bonfire and enjoy the concession stand. Yaphank Presbyterian Church 65 Main Street, Yaphank. yaphanktrail.wix.com. $10. 7-11 p.m. Oct. 9, 10, 16, 17, 23, 24, 30.Haunted Trail of HorrorsOne word: terrifying. Middle Island Fire Department, 31 Arnold Dr., Middle Island. middleislandfd.org $10. 7:30-10 p.m. Oct. 16-17, 23-24 and 30.Haunted Hay BarnPrepare to be scared. Horseability at SUNY Old Westbury. horseability.org $13. 6-10 p.m. Oct. 6, 17, 23, 24, 30, 31.The Village: Haunted Tales and TrailsDetails of this year’s haunted trail event have yet to be announced but you can expect chills and thrills. Old Bethpage Village Restoration, 1303 Round Swamp Rd., Old Bethpage. 516-572-8400. obvrnassau.com. Oct. 16-18, 23-25Spooky Walk at Camp PaquatuckBilled as the longest-running haunted walk on Long Island, this nearly three-decade old spook-filled event raises funds for Camp Pa-Qua-Tuck, a camp for children and adults with special needs. We enjoy being scared but we love a good cause so much more. 2 Chet Swezey Rd., Center Moriches. spookywalk.com $15. 7-9 p.m. Oct. 16, 17, 23 and 24.Hoyt Farm Monster MashInsanely popular with the kids, this year’s event is limited to Smithtown residents only. Hoyt Farm Town Park, 200 New Hwy., Commack. $15. RSVP at 631-543-7804. smithtownny.gov 12-4 p.m. Oct. 17, 18.Enchanted Forest TrailKids ages 2 to 7 are invited to dress up and meet whimsical, fun, and educational characters on the forest trails. Quogue Wildlife Refuge, 3 Old Country Rd., Quogue. RSVP at 631.653.4771. quoguewildliferefuge.org/events $10. Oct. 17: 11-2 p.m. Oct. 25: 12-3 p.m. Oct. 31: 11-1 p.m.Spooky FestPerfectly spooky and a little scary—fun for the whole family. Center for Science Teaching and Learning, Tanglewood Preserve, 1 Tanglewood Rd., Rockville Centre. cstl.org $15 all attractions, $10 for non-spooky attractions only. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Oct. 17, 23-25, 31, Nov. 1.Haunted Castle at Hempstead HouseMeet the ghosts of all those who ever called the castle home. Sands Point Reserve, 127 Middle Neck Rd., Sands Point. thesandspointpreserve.com $20. $15 for members. 6-11 p.m. Oct. 23-25, 29-31.Great Jack-o’-Lantern SpectacularIn addition to contestants setting sail to their Jack-o’-Lanterns, there will be a kid-friendly spooky house, balloon twisting, arts and crafts, trick or treating, “funny fotos,” games and more. Participation is limited to the first 50 carved pumpkins. Jack-o’-Lanterns will set sail at 6 p.m. Pumpkins will only be accepted if they’re between the size of a soccer ball and a basketball. And don’t let your hard work go to waste. The pumpkins must be dropped off between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. on the day of the event. Belmont Lake State Park, Southern State Parkway Exit 38, North Babylon. nysparks.com/parks/88 $8 parking, free with Empire Pass. 4 p.m.-6 p.m. Oct. 24.Trick or Treat: Shadow Puppet MakingJoin professional puppeteers as you make your own Halloween puppets. Charles B. Wang Center Chapel 100 Nicolls Rd., Stony Brook. stonybrook.edu $5, kids under 12 free. 1:30-3:30 p.m. Oct. 24.Nature’s Halloween TrailNight creatures and “scary” natural phenomenon fill the woods. Bring a flashlight. Light refreshments follow. Mashomack Preserve, 47 South Fouth Ferry Rd., Shelter Island. $5 suggested donation. 5-6:30 p.m. Oct. 24.Ghost Stories and Legends of Fire IslandListen to tales of eerie happenings along the barrier beach. Dress warm, bring blankets and flashlights. Fire Island Lighthouse, east of Robert Moses State Park Field 5. fireislandlighthouse.com Free. 7 p.m. Oct. 24.Halloween Fun FestivalThe haunted house is just the tip of the iceberg–enjoy the scare crow park, trick-or-treating, marshmallow roasting and bowling. Madison Theatre at Molloy College, 1000 Hempstead Ave., Rockville Centre. madisontheatreny.org Free. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Oct. 24Halloween Parade and Haunted HouseIf you plan on making the trip to this haunted house, you better come prepared to win. There’s “Best Costume” prizes available in a number of categories, plus goodies for all. A party at the haunted house follows the parade. From corner of Lake and Woodlawn avenues to the Gazebo, St. James. stjameschamber.org Free.1 p.m. Oct. 25 (line up at 12:30 p.m.).Spooky WalkGhouls, goblins and spooky fun for adults and kids over 7. Quogue Wildlife Refuge, 3 Old Country Rd., Quogue. RSVP at 631.653.4771. quoguewildliferefuge.org/events $15. 6:30-9 p.m. Oct. 23, 24, 30.Haunted Trail NightsFeaturing hauntingly historical buildings, a ghoulishly grassy field, and a mysterious meadow of mayhem. Manor Farm, 210 Manor Rd., Huntington. manorfarmhauntedtrailnights.webs.com $5. 7-10 p.m. Oct. 23-25. “Not-So-Spooky Trail,” 6 p.m. Oct. 25. “Escape the Haunted House Challenge,” 7, 8, 9 and 10 p.m. start times, Oct. 30. $10 per 8 person team.Cemetery of Lost SoulsGhost, demons and sacrificed virgins, oh my! 350 Broadway, Massapequa Park. lostsoulsli.com Donations vary. 8 p.m.-midnight. Oct. 24, 30 & 31.Haunted House at DeepwellsBeware the scary haunted house! Deepwells Farm County Park, corner of Route 25A and Moriches Road, St. James. stjameschamber.org Free. Times to be announced. Oct. 24, 25, 30.Spooky WalkSwamp monsters and many of their gruesome friends bring a smoggy, spine-tingling walk through the realm of fear and fright. The so-called live-action horror trail may not be suitable for young children, but children of all ages are invited for the Not-So-Spooky Walk on Oct. 25. Clark Botanic Garden, 193 I.U. Willets Rd., Albertson. clarkbotanic.org $5. 6:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Oct. 23, 24. $3 Not-So-Spooky-Walk 12 p.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 25.Haunted Path and Ghoulish Game NightNavigate the walkway where ghouls and spooks lurk, then stick around for mummy races, zombie basketball and ghost dodgeball. Southampton Youth Center, 1370A Majors Path, Southampton. $5. Grades 6 and up. 7-10 p.m. Oct. 30.Halloween SpooktacularDetails on this huge event coming soon! Great Neck House, 14 Arrandale Ave., Great Neck. greatneckparks.org3rd Annual Zombie Ball and Haunted House PartyFeaturing a haunted house, a costume contest and a dance party, this is the only stop you need to make on Halloween night. Rhythmology 361 Union Ave., Westbury. Prices vary. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Oct. 31.The Franklin Square HorrorChosen as one of the scariest home haunts on Long Island, the Franklin Square Horror promises to outdo itself this year. 1148 Norbay Street, Franklin Square. joea65.wix.com. Donations go to Autism and Cerebral Palsy Associations. 7-11 p.m. Oct. 31.last_img read more

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Harris: NAFCU to stay focused on federal issues

first_imgNAFCU is committed to keeping its focus on federal issues affecting credit unions and is seeking to codify that focus as the association’s members vote on full membership for federally-insured, state-chartered credit unions, NAFCU Chair Richard L. Harris said Thursday.NAFCU’s board has unanimously voted to amend the association’s articles of incorporation to allow its state-chartered members to vote on all NAFCU matters and to run and serve on the association’s board. It also approved revising the articles to reinforce NAFCU’s focus on federal issues for all federally-insured members. The association’s voting members have until Sept. 9 to cast their vote on whether they accept these changes.Harris said Thursday that NAFCU’s strength and purpose have always rested on the association’s focus on credit union issues at the federal level, and he said association President and CEO Dan Berger and his team will continue to work daily with that focus in mind. continue reading » 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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26 Americans on Their Hopes for the Next Four Years

first_imgPhoenix— Ginger Sykes Torres, 40 —“I really want my kids to go back to school safely. Personally, my No. 1 concern right now is the Covid epidemic, and I hope that it can be under control in the coming year. Also, I’m American Indian, I’m Navajo, and I hope that in the next few years Native Americans will have a bigger seat at the table with governments, especially our federal government, which has not been ideal in the last four years.” Westerville, Ohio— Malinda Hood, 71 —“My hope for the country is freedom for faith, peace and good will to all men. My hope is that abortion is abolished in the future.” Maryvale, Ariz.— Phyllis Minsuk, 82, and Les Minsuk, 85 —Phyllis: “I want peace within and peace outside. I want the country to come back together as caring, loving and concerned citizens, where we really live in a way where we can support each other.”Les: “I would like for us to be sane again.” Houston— Eric Zollinger, 46 —“My hope is that we all come together and there isn’t the toxicity; that somehow we realize we have more in common than we have different. I’ve been fortunate to live in several different states throughout my life, and the one common denominator is that we’re all good people at heart — at least I would hope so.” Candler, N.C.— Clyde Nance Jr., 71 —“I want the people to have harmony and love for one another in the country. I’d like to see the people get back to work, take care of their families and everything.” Houston— Laura Vasquez, 31 —“We need equality. That’s the thing over all. Everybody bickers. It’s you, it’s us, it’s them. They’re doing this, they’re doing that. Everybody needs to take responsibility for their actions.” Bethel, Maine— Margarite Bergeron, 22 —“I want equality, and I want women to be just as powerful as how they portray men. They downsize women a lot. I was a firefighter for three years, and I got a lot of crap because I was a female and I did it just as good as they did. So what I want to see is equality.” Candler, N.C.— Wayne Metcalf, 70 —“I’d just like to see us come back together, you know? And be one people and get along together.” Atlanta— Kristin Haynes, 44 —“My hope is that we find our humanity again, that we find a way to be kind to one another, and have empathy in general. I’m in a hopeless place right now in terms of what’s happened to this country, and that’s a lot coming from a Black person. I’ve never seen this total lack of respect for differences.” We talked to them about their hopes for the country — whatever the outcome of the election. What did they want for America? They spoke about equality, opportunity and coming together as a nation. Here are some of their answers. North Charleston, S.C.— Byron Jackson, 20 —“I just want the best for America. I want it to be in the hands of a good person who can lead the country, that can get us what we need.” Phoenix— Diana Rivera, 34 —“I want this economy to grow, to be able to support the undocumented, for the Latinos to be able to unite with every other race and the whole country to be able to come together and provide a better future for our future generations.” Omaha— Theresa Thompson-Liggins, 55 —“I want to make America great again, but not at the cost of lives and jobs, because I am a self-employed small business owner and I have been affected by the pandemic. It’s hitting home now. I want America to be great again, no matter who wins. This is not us.” Charleston, S.C.— Emily Bonn, 28 —“I hope people see that the medical leaders that are trying to lead us are trying to help us through something absolutely horrible. My dad is a physician, and I’m going into medicine. It’s really disheartening when people have stopped listening to the people that try and keep us healthy and safe.” Election night played out as one more anxious chapter in a year characterized by bitter partisan rancor and successive national crises.As states flickered between blue and red on projection maps, and as vote-counting extended through the week, tensions only rose. In sheer numbers, more people voted in 2020 than ever before, but the results seemed to crystallize the deep divisions in the country — on the virus, the economy, issues of race, and even how to properly count the vote.- Advertisement – Omaha— Bob Brown, 78 —“I want to see the virus beat as soon as possible. I want to see the troops all come home. I hate the players kneeling for the national anthem. They don’t respect the flag. I am very proud of my country and my service.”center_img Levant, Maine— Adam McKay, 35 —“I’d like to see a lot less fighting, but on top of that, I’d also like to see the middle class go up a little bit. I’d like to see our debt go down. I’d like for us to be able to work a little more on this free speech, be able to say what you want without having to get your head bit off.” Charleston, S.C.John Payne, 44“It’s gotten harder and harder to live in this country. These essential workers that we need — not just hospital workers but hotel employees, restaurant employees — they can’t afford to live downtown anymore. When I was a kid, everybody lived downtown, every race — everybody lived together. There’s no diversification anymore.” St. Clair Shores, Mich.— Burnett Ashley, 68 —“I’d like to see the country united, and I’d like to see more conservative values.” Franklin County, Ohio— Tyra Jackson, 51 —“My hope for America is all about the children. They need to get back to school. They are our future. They need to see a more respectful and responsible leader.” – Advertisement – “It seems like there’s so much chaos going on right now with the pandemic, and it seems like there’s so much racial differences. I think we need the right leader to bring us together versus separating us or dividing us.” Bethel, Maine— Brandon Dougherty, 21 —- Advertisement – For anyone seeking to understand the will of the people, the past week offered little clarity. The only common ground, it seemed, was the sizable majority who told exit polls they felt the country was heading in the wrong direction.And yet. The vote is fundamentally an instrument of optimism, a chance to shape the future of your community and your country. On Tuesday and in the days leading up to the election, Americans waited in line in record numbers to cast their vote. Wilmington, Del.— Kelsey Youells, 24 —“For me, a big thing is being able to respect others’ viewpoints without bashing them. I hope as a country we will come out of this election and realize that even though we may not be happy with the outcome, it’s four years and it’s your civic duty to vote, and you get to do it again in four years and make your voice heard again.” San Francisco— Jairee Tannan, 19 —“I want America to not see us as animals, you feel me? I want everybody, when they look at me — I don’t want them looking at me just as a Black man. I want them to look at me as an individual.” Marshalltown, Iowa— Ruth Dolash, 89 —“We have more hate in this country than we need. I’d like to do my part to get rid of some of that. But I don’t know where to start.”Gabriella Angotti-Jones, Ruth Fremson, Kathryn Gamble, Brittany Greeson, Tamir Kalifa, Calla Kessler, Maddie McGarvey, Lynsey Cameron Pollack, Juan Diego Reyes, Hilary Swift, Lynsey Weatherspoon and Adriana Zehbrauskas contributed reporting. Houston— Mickey Rainwater, 49 —“I hope that we can get back on track to where people aren’t focused so much on race and being treated different and work together as a team again. You can’t have a great nation without the whole team working together. Football, basketball — you can’t have one good player and have a great team. We need to work together.” Wilmington, Del.— James Couch, 35 —“I’m tired of Covid-19, so I hope the country can move past. This has been the worst time for us in our lives, and I want to see that get better and the economy get better.” – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Wood Scores Senegal Hat-Trick with Woodside

first_imgWood has been awarded three contracts to perform subsea and flow assurance studies for Woodside in Senegal, West Africa, supporting the proposed SNE field development in the Rufisque, Sangomar and Sangomar deep offshore blocks.Delivered by Wood’s technical experts in Australia and the UK, the contracts cover three separate concept definition studies: a targeted flow assurance study to ensure robust and safe design, an engineering assessment to demonstrate the feasibility of a riser and umbilical system at potential floating production storage and offloading (FPSO) facilities, and a subsea flowlines study.Bob MacDonald, CEO of Wood’s Specialist Technical Solutions business, said: “These contracts demonstrate our extensive experience in the successful delivery of technical services to Woodside for more than 35 years and our capabilities in designing offshore oil and gas facilities.“We have significant operational, design and verification experience in West Africa and look forward to applying our flexible concept evaluation and design optimisation solutions to support Woodside in the development of this important deepwater project.”last_img read more

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