January, 2021 Archive

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Alumna advises career flexibility

first_imgThe ability to adjust to a variety of opportunities is important when searching for a job, a Saint Mary’s alumna and human resources executive said Monday.Margaret Taylor, a 1978 graduate, spoke with students in the Student Center Lounge about the steps involved with finding a career, from choosing a major to job hunting.“Majors change, that’s OK,” Taylor said. “If you’re in a major you’re not so comfortable with, don’t be afraid to say, ‘hey, this isn’t the right one.’“You have to do something that you have passion in.”Taylor said she originally intended on becoming an education major at Saint Mary’s. She has since worked for 20 years as a human resources representative and currently serves as the Senior Vice President of Human Resources at Biomet Inc. in Warsaw, Ind.After changing her major to Communication Studies, she soon discovered a love for Humanistic Studies as well and decided she wanted to work in the broadcasting industry.“I really spent most of my time interning over at WNDU, which was a great experience,” Taylor said. “I had a great audition tape by the time I was done with my internship, but I knew by the end of my internship that I knew that I wasn’t sure that that’s what I wanted to do for the rest of my life.”After an internship with a local broadcasting company, Taylor had reservations about a career in broadcast journalism and began her search for a new career path. Taylor stressed the importance of internships and recommended all students pursue them.“Get your internships and get them early,” she said. “In some regard, it doesn’t matter what you intern in, especially at this stage, or where, but then you get the experience and it will tell you as much about what you don’t want to do as what you want to do.”Taylor said students must remember to be flexible when searching for a post-graduation profession, and she used a personal anecdote to illustrate her point.While working at a drugstore, Taylor said her boss submitted her name for a human resources position within the organization — and that’s how she get her start in the area she has now worked in for two decades, she said.While she was working as a human resources representative for the first time, Taylor said she realized that she knew more than she thought she did.She reminded students to have confidence in their capabilities, as well as to be willing to learn new things.“There are so many things you are learning here today that you don’t realize,” she said. Taylor said she credits much of her success to her undergraduate studies at an all-female institution.She said gender has the potential to play a role in the makeup of the workforce but said women do have a place in corporate America. She reminded students to forget about gender and instead focus on their own capabilities.last_img read more

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Two dorms subject to robberies

first_imgBurglars entered Lyons and Dillon Halls Sunday and stole computers, cell phones and personal items, said Dave Chapman, assistant director for Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP). The incidents were reported within two hours of each other, and the burglars did not force their way into the dorm or into rooms, he said. “How they got in [the dorms] is somebody had to let them in,” Chapman said. “They didn’t force their way in any of the rooms. The rooms were unlocked.” NDSP was not able to identify or catch the suspects, and Chapman said he believes it to be an isolated incident. “Every once in a while we have this happen,” he said. Chapman encouraged students to report anyone who suspiciously attempts to enter a dorm or is seen inside. “If someone tries to get in their dorm they don’t know or looks like they are tailgating them in, they should ask them, ‘Who are you here to see? Why are you here?” Chapman said. “Things like that.” He also encouraged students to call NDSP if they see anyone in dorm hallways that seems unfamiliar or out of place. “That’s what we’re going to need to catch these people,” he said. “We need the students’ help.”last_img read more

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Election tickets announced

first_imgThe Judicial Council announced six tickets for the upcoming student government elections for the offices of president and vice president, set to take place Wednesday, Feb. 6. The following tickets were announced: sophomores Billy Christy and Patrick Roemer; juniors Alex Coccia and Nancy Joyce; junior Michael Masi and sophomore Timothy Scanlan; freshmen Austin O’Brien and Nick Boggess; juniors Dominic Romeo and Philip Hootsmans; and freshmen Kevin Salat and Paul Mascarenhas. The presidential and vice presidential debates are tentatively set for Monday, Feb. 4. Should a run-off election be necessary, a second debate between the remaining candidates is set for Thursday, Feb. 7, with a final election to take place on Monday, Feb. 11, according to the Judicial Council’s website. The winning ticket will take office April 1, succeeding current student body president Brett Rocheleau and current student body vice president Katie Rose.last_img read more

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Arts and Letters celebrates sixth annual SonnetFest

first_imgShakespeare at Notre Dame and the College of Arts and Letters will  host the sixth annual SonnetFest in the Great Hall of O’Shaughnessy today from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Members of the Notre Dame community are encouraged to stop by and listen to the public reading of Shakespeare’s 154 sonnets.Peter Holland, Notre Dame’s McMeel Family professor in Shakespeare studies and associate dean for the arts, said SonnetFest is a unique celebration of love and Valentine’s Day.“I think this sequence of sonnets is the greatest love poetry that exists in the English language,” he said. “Not because it all reads like Hallmark cards but exactly the opposite. It shows that love is full of a remarkable range of emotions.”Scott Jackson, executive director of Shakespeare at Notre Dame, said SonnetFest traditionally features a number of diverse readings. In the past, sonnets have been read in Spanish, French, Italian, German, Russian, Chinese, Tagalog, American Sign Language, Morse Code, Klingon and Parseltongue.“Since this is a College of Arts and Letters event, we try to engage all the departments within Arts and Letters,” he said. “That means there’s a lot of language study. Shakespeare really is a universal author who crossed a lot of cultural lines and divides.”SonnetFest aims to unify all of the varying disciplines of Arts and Letters around Shakespeare’s works, Jackson said.“He’s universal in the themes that he writes about,” he said. “In a way, that’s a nice symbol for the College of Arts and Letters because the course of study involves a myriad of disciplines, but at the end of the day they’re all related — in some way or another — to human experience.”A variety of students, faculty and members of the South Bend community volunteered to read the sonnets, Jackson said.“It’s a low stress way to get some practice with public speaking,” he said. “For a lot people, that’s a fear greater than death. Reading a sonnet is a good and easy exercise to just get over that anxiety of public speaking.”Holland said the venue enhances SonnetFest by providing a chance to engage the student population that may not have much previous exposure to Shakespeare.“Most of the time, the Great Hall is the place between Waddick’s and the outside world,” Holland said. “It’s a place of transition. I think it’s nice when there’s something going on in there — something that’s interactive and participatory without being virtual and digital.”One of the goal’s of SonnetFest and Shakespeare at Notre Dame is to promote a curiosity in Shakespeare in the University community, Jackson said.“We really encourage people to walk through and check out [SonnetFest] for a couple of minutes,” he said. “You can stay for one poem, or you can listen to 30 sonnets. We’re just hoping to broaden the culture of Shakespeare here on campus.”Jackson said SonnetFest is scheduled as close to Valentine’s Day as possible because Shakespeare’s sonnets celebrate love in all forms.“Within his 154 sonnets, Shakespeare wrote about all different experiences in life at all different stages in life,” Jackson said. “The common theme that ties it all together is the importance of love in your life. Love is what makes life worth living. There are many poems that might be about death or duplicity, but they are all rooted in the passion that one person has for another.”Tags: Shakespeare, Shakespeare at Notre Dame, SonnetFestlast_img read more

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Senate hears presentation from Campus Dining

first_imgCampus dining representatives presented to student senate Wednesday regarding the continuing changes to the campus dining experience.Chris Abayasinghe, the senior director of campus dining, announced the dining options that will open in the new Duncan Student Center in January.The restaurants in the student center will be Haggerty Cafe, featuring Intelligentsia coffee, Freshens smoothies and crepes, the Modern Market, offering artisan pizzas and farm-to-fork food and Star Ginger, serving Vietnamese, Thai and Southeast Asian food. The hours of operation will vary restaurant to restaurant with late night weekend hours offered by Haggerty Cafe and Star Ginger.“We want to live in the space,” Abayasinghe said. “While I’m saying that these are the hours and ideas that we’re floating around, this isn’t etched in stone. This can change.”Director of student dining Scott Kachmarik updated the group on past and upcoming changes to the dining halls.“I am hearing a lot of excitement about the new restaurants that are going in,” Kachmarik said. “I’m trying to make sure that we understand that the dining halls could become a destination restaurant as well.”Kachmarik explained that the changes that have been implemented this semester, such as the increase in flex points, the option to enter the dining hall multiple times in one mealtime and the five complementary RSVP meals, have all been a result of past student feedback.“You see some of the things that we’ve done in North Dining Hall, with the booths and the different seating arrangements,” Kachmarik said. “We want it to be a place where you can come and feel comfortable, but at the same time we’re also working on the issue of speed. We’ve made some changes that, if you need to be able to run in and run out, we can get that going as well.”Kachmarik said he has heard negative feedback about the substitution of the Marketplace for Grab and Go at North Dining Hall this semester. Campus dining introduced the Marketplace based on previous student feedback questioning the value proposition of meal swipes used at Grab and Go.“However, as we look ahead to next semester, we heard you,” Kachmarik said. “We’re going to be offering some type of a Grab and Go in the North Dining Hall Marketplace. What we’re planning on doing is having many of the items that are in the South Dining Hall Grab and Go. We’ll have those labeled in a cooler and will allow you to get your seven points and allow you to get that with your meal tap.”Further upcoming changes include beginning to use the video boards in North Dining Hall to display nutrition facts, extending dining hall hours on days at the end of breaks to account for later returns to campus and offering hot breakfast beginning at 8 a.m. on the weekend before finals.Abayasinghe hopes to improve the sustainability of the dining operations.“Our vision for how we want to look at food is to look at it in a really holistic fashion,” Abayasinghe said. “We want to make sure that the options we provide you are nutritious and healthy, that they’re environmentally sustainable, that they also align very closely with the social and ethical values that I hold for myself and my team and, naturally, it has to be delicious, it has to be culinary-relevant and have cultural appeal.”Campus Dining directors are currently working on a plan to provide students with re-useable to-go containers, a program which they plan to pilot at the Marketplace, and are discussing applying a “sin” tax to disposable containers, Abayasinghe said.Both North and South Dining Hall now use a red running man icon to denote food options that nutritionists have confirmed to be healthy.“We worked with Student Affairs and we worked with the athletic department about developing a menu that increases your ability to perform at a high level,” Kachmarik said.However, with the many changes to Campus Dining this semester, there seems to be a lack of knowledge about the meal plans and hours of operation among the student body, Claire Saltzman, the Ryan Hall senator, said.In response, Kachmarik acknowledged that Campus Dining needs to improve in this regard.“That’s something I think we need to work on,” Kachmarik said. “We’re doing a better job of telling our story, but I also think we’re not doing a very good job of telling what you need to know.”Tags: Campus DIning, duncan student center, North Dining Hall, Notre Dame Student Senate, South Dining Halllast_img read more

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Holy Cross loses power, forced to evacuate

first_imgHoly Cross College lost power at about 6:25 a.m. Wednesday morning, requiring all students to relocate to North Dining Hall.“We were notified about the power outage, or knew about it, at about 6:25 a.m. [Wednesday] morning, and then we notified all of our students — the residents of the outage — and gave some initial instructions at 6:56 a.m.,” JudeAnne Hastings, director of development for Holy Cross, said. “And then pretty quickly, it was determined that we were going to have to evacuate for the safety since it was so cold. So, then there was an alert to evacuate with specific instructions at 8:15 a.m., with evacuation beginning at 8:30 a.m.”All students were evacuated by 9:30 a.m. to North Dining Hall. Notre Dame Transpo buses brought the students to Notre Dame’s campus.Power to the the buildings was restored around 10:30 a.m., Hastings said. However, facilities staff made sure the heat was working in the residence halls and that the buildings began to warm up before sending students back to campus.“All students have been evacuated and are safe,” Monica Garvey Leyes, assistant director of communications at Holy Cross, said in a statement later that morning. “Power at Holy Cross College has been restored. Students will be shuttled back to campus once rooms in the residence halls have fully warmed up. Holy Cross College wishes to thank all who helped in ensuring the safety of its students, especially the University of Notre Dame.”Around 1:30 p.m., Holy Cross announced in a Facebook post all students had “safely returned to campus.”“Our most heartfelt thanks to Transpo for their transportation services during this time, to the University of Notre Dame North Dining Hall, to the Holy Cross Residence Life and Housing staff, and all who helped our students stay warm and safe,” the post said.The cause of the outage is currently unknown, though Hastings said that Holy Cross staff is currently working with American Electric Power to find out what happened to cause the power to fail.“We are just eternally grateful for Notre Dame and the partnership we have with them and them just opening their arms to us during this time,” she said. Tags: Holy Cross, Polar Vortex, power outagelast_img read more

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Notre Dame clubs to host murder mystery dinner and other Halloween events

first_imgAs the temperature progressively lowers and the perma-cloud begins to make itself comfortable in South Bend once again, students and faculty at Notre Dame alike prepare to celebrate Halloween season in a variety of ways.Alicia Bates, assistant director of student programming, said the Student Activities Office has a wide array of Halloween and fall-themed events planned. These events are based off both what has interested students in past years and what reflects the overall mission of the SAO, Bates said.“Part of SAO’s mission is to enhance the overall student experience through exposure to and participation in recreational and social opportunities,” Bates said in an email. “These events allow students to maintain existing and create new connections.”To this purpose, this year SAO will be hosting a Thinkfast Halloween Game Show on Thursday from 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. in the LaFortune Student Center Ballroom. The event will provide free pizza and offers a $200 prize for the trivia winner. In the spirit of the fall season, SAO is also hosting a classic murder mystery dinner in the LaFortune Ballroom on Saturday from 9 p.m. to 11 p.m.“The murder mystery is your classic ‘whodunit’ with an improv comedy twist,” Bates said in the email.SAO will also host “iceless skate night” Friday from 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. in the Stepan Center. Skateless-skaters can partake in hot drinks and treats from the Beavers Coffee and Donuts food truck, which will be provided.Bates said these events have been widely attended in the past, and she hopes they will be successful in facilitating a stronger and more connected community at Notre Dame.“It is our hope that by planning these events during a time when students are looking to celebrate not just a holiday, but a season, we are offering fun and healthy events that assist in creating a community students are looking to be a part of,” Bates said in the email.Other campus organizations also have Halloween events planned. Student Union Board intends to celebrate Halloween in song by hosting an “aspookicafe” on Thursday from 10 p.m. to 11 p.m. at the Hagerty Family Cafe. Filii Mariae has planned an All Saints Halloween party Thursday from 10:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. in the Knights of Columbus house.Junior Class Council hosted a Fall Festival in the LaFortune Ballroom on Tuesday, with pumpkin painting and fall-related treats like apple cider, Rise’n Roll donuts, pumpkin pie and candy corn.Junior Madison Bollenbacher, member of the Health and Wellness Committee on Junior Class Council, said the events were intended to relieve students’ stress in addition to celebrating the season.“With only around four school weeks left in the semester before exams, this time of year can get really busy and stressful for a lot of students,” Bollenbacher said. “So it’s important to take time out of the day to relax and enjoy the season and spend time with friends.”Bollenbacher said the event is a way to help students participate in activities they wouldn’t normally get a chance to on campus.“Most people love autumn and taking part in fall activities, but it can be hard at college if you’re busy and don’t have a car to actually take the time to pick out pumpkins or just enjoy autumn-inspired comfort foods,” Bollenbacher said. “Junior Class Council tries to bring typical fall activities to campus so that more students can spend time together enjoying the short fall season.”Tags: autumn, fall festival, halloween, iceless skate night, junior class council, On Campus, spooky season, Student Activities Officelast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s community mourns student death

first_imgIsabelle Melchor, a Saint Mary’s senior, died March 12, according to an email the Office of the President sent to the College community Monday.Melchor was a global studies major, according to the email. She was involved with the Belles Against Violence Office, La Fuerza, Belles Connect, Anthropology Club and SMC orchestra.One of Melchor’s professors said in the email that she was “exactly the kind of humble, curious and hardworking student that made his job so great.”“Isabelle was a true inspiration,” the email said. “In spite of her health situation, regardless of how horrible she felt, she was quick to flash her infectious smile and she worked hard to be present and complete her education at Saint Mary’s.”The College invited the community to pray for Melchor’s family, her friends and her faculty as they manage during this difficult time.Tags: Office of the President, Student deathlast_img read more

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Provost, executive vice president announce University COVID-19 vaccination efforts

first_imgNotre Dame Provost Marie Lynn Miranda and Executive Vice President Shannon Cullinan provided updates on COVID-19 vaccinations in relationship to the University’s response to the pandemic in an email Friday.The email said those who are currently eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine in their respected states are encouraged to make an appointment for vaccination.“The vaccines currently available have been shown to be highly effective and have undergone rigorous testing before being released to the public,” the email said. “We celebrate the fact that many of our Notre Dame first responders and medical professionals have already received the first dose of the vaccine locally, in accordance with state guidelines.”The University has added a page to the HERE COVID-19 response page regarding vaccination efforts in Indiana and Michigan, as well as information on eligibility.“Vaccination becomes even more important as new, more transmissible variants of COVID-19 are circulating in the U.S., including in Indiana,” the website says.According to the email from the provost and executive vice president, the University is in the process of applying to become a vaccination administration location.“There is no guarantee that we will be approved by the Indiana Department of Health,” they said. “If we are approved, it is unclear when we might receive doses, how many we will receive and what rules for allocation/distribution will apply.”Notre Dame will follow vaccine allocation guidelines in accordance to the Indiana Department of Health.“While vaccines are a critical component of our COVID-19 response, it is incumbent on each of us to remain vigilant and to follow our health and safety protocols,” the email said.Tags: COVID-19, Provost Marie Lynn Miranda, Shannon Cullinan, vaccinelast_img read more

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Some Governors Worry That Federal Aid Is Too Restrictive

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) MGN Stock ImageWASHINGTON – Governors in a handful of states are raising concerns about restrictions on the federal stimulus checks they have started to receive to help cover the costs of combating the coronavirus.New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy, a Democrat whose state has had nearly 100,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases, the second-most in the country, said Thursday that much of the $1.8 billion heading there is “unusable” and might have to be returned to the U.S. Treasury. Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee, a Republican, made similar comments the day before.Those doubts come even as states are expecting tax revenue to crater, leading to layoffs and budget cuts.The $150 billion in aid to state and local governments is part of the $2.2 trillion relief bill passed by Congress last month. Every state is getting at least $1.2 billion, while the most populous cities and counties also receive a share. In guidance issued Wednesday, the Treasury Department told states that the money had to be used to deal with the medical emergency caused by the outbreak. It generally could not be used for expenses that were accounted for in budgets adopted by March 27.But the department did leave some wiggle room: First responders and other government employees “whose services are substantially dedicated to mitigating or responding to the COVID-19 public health emergency” can have their salaries paid with the aid from March through December, according to the guidance.Shelby Kerns, executive director of the National Association of State Budget Officers, said in an email that states are still reviewing the documents but that “we expect most to be able to use the full allotment.”Virginia Secretary of Finance Aubrey Layne said he was surprised at how restrictive Treasury’s rules for the state aid are and understands why governors wonder if they might have to return some of the money.“I’m going to try my best not to do that,” he said.The National Governors Association is pushing Congress to approve an additional $500 billion to replace state and local revenue that has evaporated amid the business closures and record job losses during the pandemic.last_img read more

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