June, 2021 Archive

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England v Barbarians: The Preview

first_imgENGLAND: Ben Foden; Chris Ashton, Brad Barritt, Owen Farrell, Christian Wade; Charlie Hodgson, Lee Dickson; Matt Stevens, Dylan Hartley, Paul Doran-Jones, Mouritz Botha, Tom Palmer, Tom Johnson, Carl Fearns, Phil Dowson (capt).Replacements: Lee Mears, Matt Mullan, Joe Launchbury, Jamie Gibson, Richard Wigglesworth, Jonathan Joseph, Alex Goode.BARBARIANS: Mils Muliaina; Paul Sackey, Casey Laulala, Mike Tindall, IaIn Balshaw; Stephen Donald, Rory Lawson; Neemia Tialata, John Smit (capt), John Afoa, Mark Chisholm, Anton van Zyl, Ernst Joubert, John Beattie, Akapusi Qera.Replacements: Benoit August, Duncan Jones, Pelu Taele, Raphael Lakafia, Jerome Fillol, Felipe Contepomi, Sailosi Tagicakibau. New boy: Wasps wing Christian Wade is making his senior England debut at Twickenham on SundayBy Sarah Mockford, Rugby World Features EditorTHIS IS the strongest team England have put out for this fixture for many a year, with plenty of familiar faces from the Six Nations in the startling line-up. They will want to start building momentum for the South Africa tour with a good win at Twickenham, but the Barbarians are not short of talent themselves.Fresh facesChristian Wade is set to make his debut for a senior England side and this should be just the type of game for the Wasps wing to show his wares. Barbarians games tend to be fairly open – perfect for Wade to use his fancy footwork and lightening pace to great effect.It will also be interesting to see how Tom Johnson and Carl Fearns fare in the back row. They have been in good form for their clubs Exeter and Bath respectively, but they face an experienced Baa-Baas back row in Ernst Joubert, John Beattie and Akapusi Qera, so expect a fierce battle at the contact area.Centre stage: Baa-Baas’ Mike TindallKey battlesBen Foden is up against one of world rugby’s most experienced players ever in Mils Muliaina. Both men like to counter-attack from deep and the crowd will be hoping to see plenty of that.Mike Tindall will have a big point to prove as he lines up for the Baa-Baas against England’s centre pairing of Brad Barritt and Owen Farrell. That trio are sure to be dishing out some brutal hits, but it’s the fourth centre – Casey Laulala – who is likely to be the biggest threat in attack. The Kiwi is a great reader of the game, picks lovely angles and has the ability to put players through holes with his soft hands.The England front row face a stern test. The Baa-Baas have two World Cup winners in their front row in captain John Smit and prop John Afoa, and their triumvirate is completed by another ex-All Black Neemia Tialata. If England can gain parity at the set-piece, it will certainly bode well for the physical South Africa tour that awaits, particularly as their first-choice props Dan Cole and Alex Corbisiero are missing. Pointing the way: Stuart LancasterGoal settingOne of the criticisms of England during the Six Nations was their limited attacking game. This fixture presents a perfect chance to develop that area of their game. Baa-Baas matches tend to have a lot of broken-field play and the balmy weather means both sides will have good conditions for running rugby.The pace of England’s back three is significant against a more ageing Baa-Baas trio, so the challenge for Charlie Hodgson is to get the ball to them in space. Then the Twickenham crowd should be cheering a few England tries.VerdictStuart Lancaster is taking this game seriously and I think he’s going to be repaid with a 12-point win.ENGLAND v BARBARIANS, TWICKENHAM, SUNDAY 27 MAY, 2.30pm, Live on Sky Sports NOT FOR FEATURED LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Lions 2013: The need for tactical change in the second Test: Attack

first_imgBritish and Irish Lions player’s Alun Wyn Jones (L) and Alex Corbisiero (R) try to push the ball forward against Australia during their rugby union match at Suncorp Stadium in Brisbane on June 22, 2013. British and Irish Lions won the match 23-21. AFP PHOTO/ Patrick HAMILTONIMAGE RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE – STRICTLY NO COMMERCIAL USE (Photo credit should read PATRICK HAMILTON/AFP/Getty Images) Smart attack: Alex Cuthbert scored a great try thanks to quick ball and brilliant decoy running lines for his centresBy Alan DymockTHE DIFFICULT second Test is coming and both teams have finalised their lineups. The Wallabies have swapped out injured players, while the British and Irish Lions have made five changes.Warren Gatland himself said: “I don’t know about not changing a winning side; it is about picking the best team to do the job for us.” He is hinting at tactical reasons for the cutting and pasting of his team sheet. Looking back at the first Test footage, he certainly has reasons to change.AttackDiscounting a few moments of individual brilliance by George North, the Lions could always pry more space out of the Wallabies.A moment of individual brilliance: George North scores a tryHowever, looking at the first Test, there was an element of fear in the Australian defence whenever the Lions had a lineout in their final third. In fact, 22 minutes in, James Horwill took a captain’s decision to come into the Lions driving lineout from the side and give away a penalty. Seven minutes later, again in their own third, the Lions patiently built a drive and Michael Hooper swam through, trying to knock limbs out of the way. North almost scored a second try once that ball was recycled – he was denied by his own funny bone – but the referee was already playing advantage for the maul infringement.Australia are scared of the driving maul.What Australia do not fear, however, is the Lions’ sixth phase of attack. The aimless kicking of Mike Phillips was one of the reasons he has been dropped for this Test, as well as a niggling knee complaint, and Ben Youngs’ mindless hoof in the 66th minute in the first Test eventually found it’s way to Kurtley Beale who stepped inside the Lions kick chase and round Richard Hibbard who was not as fast or as close to Sam Warburton as he would have liked, and the full-back broke through. opportunities like this come when there is no momentum, the Lions rack up the phases and do not find touch.Another example of late-phase limpness was shown in the second-half. After 63 minutes Mako Vunipola nicely evaded a no-arm tackle from Wycliff Palu before Jamie Heaslip did well to avoid hits as he slogged up the park on his own. That led to Alex Cuthbert getting the ball, but going to ground too early. Benn Robinson was penalised for getting his foot in and going for the ball when the ruck had formed, but by going to ground too early Cuthbert had ensured that the penalty kick was the only option for the Lions, rather than using much quicker ball. The Lions must maintain the level of movement that led to their second try and continue to power players through the initial contact. There will be more lineouts but there will also be more need to generate quick ball from those lineouts. Staying on feet and laying ball on a plate can only improve the Lions chances of a series victory.Check out our tactical explanation of why change was needed in defence, here. This contrasted poorly with Cuthbert’s own try. It stemmed from a recycled lineout. Tom Youngs carried strongly and Alun Wyn Jones and Paul O’Connell grabbed him and fired him through tackles. With such quick ball Jonny Sexton was able to set his back line and synchronise running lines.Brian O’Driscoll had time to run up to the defensive line incredibly flat, with a hint of inside drift. Behind him, Jonathan Davies ran a smart outside angle, heading towards the touchline and pulling defender with him. Even deeper behind Davies was Cuthbert and as he got to the defence he was able to burst through with Sexton’s pass. After that it was a race to the try-line and the winger was never going to miss out.Pushing each other: More quick ball is needed a few phases inThere were suspicions of crossing, but Cuthbert was so deep behind O’Driscoll that the try was always going to stand and he saw his way past a hapless Beale and stretching Will Genia with ease.When the game was tight, though, it was the zip from Youngs that ensured the Lions could shift their attack while the Wallabies chased. Then Dan Lydiate was introduced and suddenly it was a case of sitting in and hoping to see the Test out.Cuthbert has been replaced by a man with better ability to field kicks and experience at centre. This is no slight on Cuthbert who will see  action from the bench in the second Test. Lydiate also starts so as to shore up the defence and allow Warren Gatland to change tact if the Lions have to chase the game. They have a reserve pack of explosives.Meanwhile, Ben Youngs offers quicker use of ball and will be given the remit to find touch when the phases drag on. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Conditioning: the dip & chin combo

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS THIS MONTH we’re talking about conditioning! Check out the December 2013 edition of Rugby World to see a workout designed by John Dams, Harlequins head of performance, to help you get your conditioning spot on. Why not try this additional dip/chin combo? Time how long it takes you to do 100 dips and 50 chins, with as much rest as you need. Then work to beat your time for the next test! See how it’s done below.last_img

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Geoff Parling: “All Blacks have no ‘mystique’”

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS He tells it how he sees it and he always brings intensity to everything he does. Which is a good mentality for any Englishman to have on a weekend when myth and mystique means nothing and actions and intensity mean absolutely everything.Get the latest behind-the-scenes news from Geoff Parling and his England teammates with O2 Inside Line, the weekly show from O2 – proud sponsor of England Rugby – and the RFU, at http://youtu.be/9laJGAog1Lo during the QBE International match between England and Australia at Twickenham Stadium on November 2, 2013 in London, England. Mixing it up: Geoff Parling professes to wanting to be in amongst the action for 80 minutes every gameBy Alan DymockON THE eve of a big international it is easy to fall headlong into the habit of throwing around big, sentimental statements. That is, of course, unless you are no-nonsense second-row Geoff Parling.Talking before England’s decisive November Test against the All Blacks – a fixture England triumphed 38-21 in when it was played out a year ago – the Leicester Tiger cuts through the bluster, dismissing myths as he previewed the game. He also makes it patently clear that England have not played superbly yet.“In the last two games we have probably only played two halves of rugby,” Parling says. “I’m not saying we have switched off in the last games at all, but we haven’t put a complete game together. Of course we could have lost those games, but we didn’t.”Battling through a year on: England defeat AustraliaThe lineout specialist has extolled the strength of this England squad for pulling through two games against opposition ranked in the IRB’s top 10. He says that since beating New Zealand last year the team has not stagnated, but learned from their exploits. As an example of progress he cites England’s loss to Australia last year when a half-time lead of 14-11 was thrown away at Twickenham, as they lost 20-14. He then fast-forwards a year to when England turned around a 13-6 deficit at half-time against the Wallabies to win this November.He does concede that there shouldn’t be massive expectation as England face the Kiwis again, but he also shoots down any question of fearing the All Blacks.“I don’t think there ever has been a ‘mystique’ about the All Blacks,” he insists.“They just consistently do well and you have to respect them. They are nothing other than a very, very good team of rugby players. And last autumn the reaction to the result only came about because of the strength of New Zealand. I always get frustrated with the fuss and highlight footage after a result like that – you should play games like that, get results and move on to the next game, I always think. “It is the public reaction that changes. After beating New Zealand we are suddenly the best team in the world to those outside and then we lose to Wales in the Six Nations and we are the worst team in the world to those people. We are always something in the middle, reacting.”What Parling does say is that New Zealand do have habits; habits that England can target.Putting it to boot: The All Blacks kick oftenWhen they get chances they are deadly. They are able to counter more efficiently than almost anyone in the world, but Parling points out that they kicked more than anyone else in the Rugby Championship and any notion of the All Blacks running the ball from anywhere is just another myth to be busted. England can plan for this.The second-row also scoffs at the suggestion he should be happy for competition from other second-rows, dismissing such talk as nonsense because “every player wants to play 80 minutes of every game” and he will not be caught trotting out the usual answer to such question. What he also has no time for, he says, is looking beyond this game against New Zealand.“Talk of 2015 and beyond is for coaches to think about. For me it’s too far away and I want to concentrate on this game. Let’s not have eyes on it. I want to win this series; coaches plan for the World Cup.”last_img read more

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England: Five things we learned v Wales

first_imgRejection can be a brilliant motivator, and the likes of Danny Care, Brown, Wood and Robshaw are evidently have desire to prove themselves – although they would never openly admit as much. They didn’t make it to Australia and were desperate to prove they deserve the same recognition as Mike Phillips, Halfpenny, Dan Lydiate and Sam Warburton. Before the Ireland match, Wood explained how much he enjoys “making proven performers look average”. Such spikiness is working out well.The Western Mail’s argument that just three England players would get into Wales’ 15 might still stand – one loss does not damage the pedigree and experience of Warren Gatland’s individuals. The fact is that England’s collective culture and improving cohesion makes them better than the sum of their parts. Plus they don’t give a damn about make-believe teams anyway. They are living in the here and now. Something to celebrate: England won their first Triple Crown for 11 years after defeating WalesBy Charlie MorganIt’s tempting to splurge on hyperbole. On Sunday, England accomplished a revenge mission and drove away the demons that have haunted them over the past 12 months. Some facets of their performance at Twickenham merit exultant praise. Stuart Lancaster’s men kept Wales try-less and were very good value for a 29-18 victory. A first Triple Crown in 11 years will feel extremely sweet.But an ambitious side shouldn’t stall on their pursuit of improvement prior to Rugby World Cup 2015. Self-congratulation tends to make progress stagnate, so constructive criticism is essential. Here are five points to come from England’s third consecutive triumph.Psychological blow that could have beenMag star: RW cover star Luther Burrell on the hoofmore comprehensiveIn the wake of the Ireland triumph, some newspapers announced that Lancaster’s young team had grown up. If that is true, this was the weekend they bought their own pad and moved away from home. By bettering Wales’ physicality, England demonstrated the benefit of that 30-3 mauling at the Millennium Stadium. Lessons have been learned and the significance of a successful dress rehearsal for the Pool A encounter in 2015 cannot be underestimated.But the biggest positive to emerge was that the hosts should have won by even more. A few poor passes stopped wider runners and a golden opportunity for a lineout drive at the death was ransacked. Luther Burrell was only denied a brace by Leigh Halfpenny’s total disregard for his own body and over-excitement gave Wales an easy route back a couple of times. Following early restarts, England played too much rugby in their own 22 and put themselves in danger.Dylan Hartley – a strand-out of the entire tournament – will be hugely disappointed by the sloppy penalties he conceded. With Halfpenny around to punish most misdemeanours, avoidable indiscretions such as the one on of the stroke of half-time were misguided. When Gethin Jenkins was sent to the sin bin, England never landed the knockout punch they should have. An avalanche of points is needed in Rome to clinch the Championship – things have to get more clinical.Wilson and Rowntree redeem themselvesCian Healy destroyed England’s scrum, leaving Graham Rowntree shell-shocked. Quite right too – losing four out of nine put-ins is a simply disastrous return. For that reason, the first set-piece was ominous on Sunday afternoon. Jenkins out-manoeuvred David Wilson, compelling Romain Poite to award a penalty. Given the Frenchman is notorious for rapid, relentless whistle-blowing in favour of the dominant pack, it didn’t look good.Wilson turned it around though, eventually forcing Jenkins from the field. As the key communicator with referees during a Test week, Rowntree must take a large amount of credit for ensuring his players were aware of how Poite would referee both the scrum and breakdown. Aside from being shunted backward by Bath clubmate Paul James in the second half, Wilson’s 72-minute shift was outstanding. LONDON, ENGLAND – MARCH 09: England scrum-half Danny Care clears the ball from the scrum during RBS Six Nations match between England and Wales at Twickenham Stadium on March 9, 2014 in London, England. (Photo by Shaun Botterill/Getty Images) Enjoying form: Courtney Lawes with the ball in hand‘Proper seven’ debate is done and dustedAt the final whistle, BBC interviewer Sonja McLaughlan asked man-of-the-match Courtney Lawes what the difference was between the England of March 2013 and the current version. Following a simply staggering individual effort, the lock could have justifiably answered with one word: “me.” His athleticism, handling skills and controlled menace have undeniably elevated his status. But Lawes is just one cog in the machine.England’s pack now has multiple dimensions – off-loading, power and stratospheric fitness. Wales struggled to live with the pace and saw their defensive breakdown nullified. Sam Warburton tried manfully, but he wasn’t able to disrupt and jackal master Justin Tipuric didn’t get a sniff during his brief cameo.Tom Wood and Chris Robshaw complement each other brilliantly when deployed as flankers and made 28 tackles together as well as all the other graft. If there are still people who think a ‘genuine openside’ is England’s Holy Grail, they are massively mistaken.Morgan and Twelvetrees stood up to be countedThe void left by Billy Vunipola and his ankle injury earned a lot of air-time ahead of this fixture, many questioning whether a builder’s son from Dursley who used to be too tubby would be able to provide the same impact at No 8. Turns out he could. And then some. For a start, he got through 80 minutes, more than Vunipola has yet done. In that period, Morgan made 15 carries, 13 tackles (without missing one) and two offloads. There were also ten passes, many of which released a secondary runner to stretch Wales – a crucial component of England’s attacking shape.Billy Twelvetrees has been another to endure this season’s travails at Kingsholm, as well as a certain amount of flak recently. Though there were a couple of loose kicks early on, England’s inside centre responded magnificently overall. Roberts was shackled and distribution seemed quicker, allowing Luther Burrell a more prominent role. Indeed, England’s midfield pair combined fantastically for the second try – Twelevetrees’ grubber inch-perfect for Burrell to dot down.Lions snubs have spurred England Standing up: Danny Care, while Mike Phillips shouts onAnticipation for last summer’s British and Irish Lions tour reached overkill. The practice of selecting potential Test sides grew stale and by the time the first Test arrived, every pundit had suggested about 25 different teams. That said, it’s irresistible to ponder who might wear red if there was a Test against the All Blacks on Saturday. One thing is for sure: there would be a good few Englishmen in contention. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Twickenham to host NFL games

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Glorious view: Twickenham will host at least three NFL games from next year The RFU have announced a joint venture with the NFL to host a minimum of three regular season games at Twickenham Stadium over a three-year period. While figures haven’t been released, this has the hallmark of a significant deal between both of the sport’s governing bodies and is the first of its kind for the RFU.The deal will commence in October 2016 with the selected teams for this game being revealed later this year. Furthermore the deal will also give the NFL the opportunity to stage two more games over the same period.Sophie Goldschmidt, RFU Chief Commercial and Marketing Officer was delighted with the deal.She said: “We are delighted to welcome the NFL to Twickenham – a stadium that has played such an integral role in what has been the biggest Rugby World Cup ever,“The NFL has a strong and growing fan base in the UK, and this, combined with the investments we’ve made in our stadium will give fans more opportunities to experience the action first-hand at a world-class venue. After a successful roll-out at Wembley stadium, the NFL said that it had extended its deal with the home of football util 2020, with the venue hosting at least two regular-season games a year until 2020.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.center_img “We look forward to working with the NFL on this partnership.”Home sweet home: NFL game between Kansas City Chiefs and Detroit Lions at WembleyMark Waller, executive vice-president of international, NFL, added: “We are committed to continuing to grow our sport in the UK and believe that adding Twickenham Stadium to our roster of host venues in London is further evidence of that commitment.“We are very excited to give our fans the opportunity to enjoy NFL action at another world-class venue famous for attracting loyal and passionate fans from across the globe.” New deal sees NFL to play three games at Twickenham over three years, which could be increased to five games over the three-year periodlast_img read more

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Legendary Japanese-American priest celebrated in Nebraska

first_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY Kim Hachiya says: The Rev. Canon Timothy M. Nakayama says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem July 31, 2012 at 2:41 pm Adam: Here is a link to the website for the book. If the link fails, the book is called Nikkei Farmer and was published by Texas Tech University Press. If you do a google search, it will come up.Good luck. It’s a good read. I was privileged to attend the events in North Platte, Neb., this past weekend and they were sacred and celebratory.http://ttupress.org/CatalogueRetrieve.aspx?ProductID=2065582&A=SearchResult&SearchID=4752699&ObjectID=2065582&ObjectType=27 Comments (7) Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Liturgy & Music Rev. William Underhill says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing July 30, 2012 at 12:40 pm Fr Hiram Hisanori Kano, identified with the Episcopal Church USA, and known for bringing the Christian Faith to Japanese-Americans in Nebraska in pre-World War II years, came from Japan to the USA. He, among fellow immigrants, was incarcerated during World War II as a highly visible “enemy alien” in spite of the fact that he taught fellow Japanese immigrants to live as loyal law-abiding citizens even if they were not allowed by law at that time from becoming American citizens! To remove him from being visible and in circulation as a leader, he was put away in a “Guard House” among American soldiers, AWOL (“Absent WithOut Leave”) where he became a facilitator among fellow-prisoners!It was my honor and privilege to be visited in Canada by Fr. Kano in the 1950’s after i had been newly Ordained into the ministry of the Anglican Church of Canada in the Diocese of Calgary. I took him to see the Canadian Rockies. As we were overlooking the Banff Springs Hotel Fr. Kano told me about his WW II experiences of incarceration in a U.S. Military Guard House, and how he helped fellow prisoners.My father, a fellow Priest in the Diocese of Calgary, was being visited by Fr. Kano, when he brought him to visit me! New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Bath, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET July 30, 2012 at 12:43 pm The Rev. Canon Timothy M. Nakayama, Priest Retired, the Episcopal Church USA, Diocese of Olympia – the Episcopal Church in the Western part of the State of Washington. Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Legendary Japanese-American priest celebrated in Nebraska Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR August 6, 2012 at 7:05 pm I am Hiram’s great-grandson. I’d be happy to send you an electronic copy of his memoirs if you want. How would you like me to send you it? The Rev. Hiram Kano leads worship at a church in Nebraska.[Episcopal News Service] While imprisoned in four World War II internment camps in four years the Rev. Hiram Hisanori Kano led worship, ministered to and taught those around him, including his jailers, other internees, and German POWs.The Nebraska priest’s life and ministry are the stuff of legend, so much so that the state legislature adopted a resolution recognizing his contributions and Gov. Dave Heineman has designated July 29 as “Father Hiram Hisanori Kano Day.”Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori will officiate at a 4 p.m. festival Eucharist in Kano’s honor July 29 at the Church of Our Savior in North Platte, Nebraska.“Fr. Kano’s life and ministry offer a remarkable witness to the transformative power of loving one’s enemy,” the presiding bishop said.Recently, the 77th General Convention of the Episcopal Church in Indianapolis approved preliminary steps to include Kano in Holy Women, Holy Men, the church’s calendar of commemorations.Cyrus Kano, 91, a retired mechanical engineer, said his father turned adversity into fertile mission territory.“He said, well, God put me here, what does he want me to do?” Kano recalled during a recent telephone interview from his home in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. “He saw in one of the camps that his fellow prisoners were many of the leaders of the Japanese community — many professors, doctors, lawyers, dentists and other professional people — and he organized a camp college and he invited all the people in the camp, including the guards, to attend these classes as they saw fit,” Kano said.“My father also did nature studies and took groups of people out into the swamp in Louisiana and explained about the leaves on the cypress trees and the animals — the water moccasins, the alligators,” he added.Adeline Kano, 84, agreed, adding that although their father “was interned, he was still a very busy man, trying to continue to do his work as a priest, as a human being, trying to help other people.“These were all men incarcerated and it was difficult, you know, for them to keep focused on staying calm and cool and positive. So some of the things my father did while he was in these camps was … to teach the prisoners about nature. It could help keep their minds off the fact that they were incarcerated and away from their families.”Kano also conducted worship services while incarcerated. “Even the Air Force, the prisoners would talk to him. There were some German prisoners there. He always tried to give everybody hope because that’s what our belief is in.”Kano emigrated to the United States after a youthful encounter with William Jennings Bryan in his native Japan stirred his sense of adventure, according to his daughter, Adeline Kano.“My grandfather was the governor of the prefecture of Kagoshina,” explained Kano, 84, during a recent telephone interview from her Fort Collins, Colorado home.“When Papa came to the United States in 1916 he went to Bryan’s home,” she said.Initially, Kano earned a master’s degree in agricultural economics at the University of Nebraska, and just as quickly became an activist and leader among the Japanese “Issei” or the first-generation community, many of whom had come to farm or to work on the railroads.The Rt. Rev. George Allen Beecher, then bishop of the missionary Diocese of Western Nebraska, heard about Kano’s activism in 1921, when state lawmakers were considering legislation that would preclude Japanese immigrants from owning or inheriting land, or even leasing it for more than two years. Nor would they be allowed to own shares of stock in companies they had formed.Kano and Beecher met and traveled together to the state capitol to address lawmakers, who eventually passed a less restrictive measure, according to Kano’s memoir, “Nikkei Farmer on the Nebraska Plains.”The Rev. Hiram KanoBeecher persuaded Kano several years later to become a missionary to the Japanese community, estimated at about 600. In 1925, Kano complied and the family moved to North Platte. He was ordained a deacon three years later and served two mission congregations, St. Mary’s Church in Mitchell and St. George’s Church in North Platte. He was ordained to the priesthood in 1936.Rose Yamamoto, who translated Kano’s memoir from Japanese into English, said, “If Fr. Kano hadn’t been with us we wouldn’t be Episcopalians now. He led the Christian community in Mitchell and North Platte.”Roy S. Yanagida was just a boy but he remembers Kano as “being very instrumental in providing leadership, especially education. He provided the leadership for my parents, along with a lot of others to receive citizenship to the United States.”Like a lot of other immigrants, his father Toshiro Yanagida arrived in North Platte to work on the railroad, and later became a sharecropper. “North Platte was quite the city for Japanese immigrants,” he recalled.The churches Kano pastored were “a gathering point for many of us,” Yanagida recalled. “We also had a Japanese school at the church where we studied the Japanese language.”He also remembers the shock and sorrow that flooded the community after the Dec. 7 attack on Pearl Harbor. FBI agents arrested Fr. Kano later that day; he spent the next four years in various concentration camps.“They took him immediately because he was the leader of the group,” Yanagida recalled. “The rest of us didn’t have to go to an interment camp because they told us we were inland enough — that if we had been on the west coast we would have had to go.”Busy is the way Adeline Kano remembers her father. That he was always working, whether caring for others, or studying, or preparing sermons.Even so, she didn’t realize the tremendous impact of his ministry upon the community, she said. “I just knew that he was busy, and that the went back and forth, wherever we lived, whether in the panhandle of Nebraska or in North Platte.”Often, it was a team ministry, she added. “At that time we didn’t have babysitters,” she recalled. “We would all go to visit the families. We’d get in the car and go.”A lot of it was accomplished with the support and assistance of her mother, Aiko Ivy Kano, she added.She feels humbled about the upcoming celebration, which both she and her brother plan to attend.“I knew he did a lot, but I just didn’t realize the magnitude of it,” she said. About the possibility of her father being added to the church calendar, she said: “It’s awesome. It is a humbling experience.”The Rev. Winfred Vergara, Asiamerica missioner for the Episcopal Church, agreed. “Giving this honor would vindicate Fr. Kano and the thousands of Japanese Americans who were wrongfully herded and placed in the internment camps during World War II.“Kano’s pastoral ministry among his fellow Japanese internees and pastoral care extended to Caucasian soldiers who were imprisoned for being AWOL and deserters, and earned him the sobriquet as ‘saint of Nebraska’ and a credible agent of the ministry of reconciliation,” said Vergara.There will also be a celebration of the two mission congregations Kano led, St. Mary’s in Mitchell and St. George’s in North Platte. Eventually the two were folded into other congregations, like Church of Our Savior, said Steve Kay, a parishioner who organized the celebrations.“He was an amazing man,” Kay said of Kano during a recent telephone interview.” He devoted his life to helping immigrants, he taught them. He was an agricultural advisor.After he retired, Hiram and Aiko Kano moved to Fort Collins, Colorado, where Adeline Kano lives. He died in 1988, just shy of his 100th birthday; she passed away in 1997, two months before her 100th birthday.— The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Aaron Kano-Bower says: Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA Ethnic Ministries, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Comments are closed. By Pat McCaughanPosted Jul 26, 2012 Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing August 17, 2012 at 3:30 pm I’ll appreciate an “electronic copy of his memoirs” if that is not too much trouble. Peace. Tom+ The Rev. Canon Timothy M. Nakayama says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Adam Youker says: Featured Jobs & Calls Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Fr. Tom Van Culin says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME July 28, 2012 at 11:48 am Where does one get a copy of his autobiography? July 28, 2012 at 5:22 pm I am delighted to read of the proposal to give Rev. Hiram Kano a “day” on our Episcopal calendar. I hope the proposal succeeds. I have met Fr. Kano. For several years, his son Cyrus Kano was my next door neighbor on Cape Cod. When Cy’s daughter was to be married, at Church of the Messiah, Woods Hole (Falmouth, Massachusetts, I was asked to assist Fr. Kano as he officiated at her wedding. At the time Fr. Kano was elderly and beginning to be a little frail. It was my pleasure and privilege to stand beside him and help in any way needed. Very little help was needed, but I was glad to there, to meet and serve with him at his granddaughter Susan’s wedding. He had a wonderful spirit, and had a great ministry in Nebraska, strong and creative, among his fellow Japanese who, sadly, were incarcerated by our government during the second world war. I am also glad to hear that his son Cyrus is still living on the Cape.last_img read more

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‘Participating in God’s mission’; GEMN wraps up in Bogotá

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC ‘Participating in God’s mission’; GEMN wraps up in Bogotá Rector Knoxville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Dianne Smith says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments (1) Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Latin America, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET May 21, 2013 at 4:19 pm Kudos and gratitude to The Rev. Dr. Ted Gaiser, who developed, organized and implemented this conference for GEMN, Title IX and missioners everywhere! An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET By Lynette WilsonPosted May 10, 2013 Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments are closed. Tags Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release Province IX Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Young Adult Service Corps missionaries Nina Boe and Ashley Bingaman during the closing Eucharist of the 18th annual Global Episcopal Mission Conference in Bogotá.Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Bogotá, Colombia] “Together Christ’s body can and will reconcile and heal this world. ¡Si, se puede!” said Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, in a sermon delivered during the closing Eucharist of the 18th annual Global Episcopal Mission Network (GEMN) conference.“Well, friends, I think you’ve found some powerful assurance in these last few days.  For one, you’re not alone. There is quite a team gathered here, and it represents a much larger network of missioners and disciples. This body is like the handful of disciples watching Jesus rise into the clouds,” said Jefferts Schori.“There are some wonderful old paintings and stained-glass windows that show just his feet, hanging out from under the cloud into which he’s disappeared. Those feet are here, along with Jesus’ hands and heart and spirit. In a very real sense, those disciples couldn’t get to work until Jesus left – while he was there, they wanted him to fix everything. He kept telling them, ‘you feed them’ and ‘you heal them,’ but they never really got started until he was no longer there to do it for them.” [Sermon text available in English and Spanish here.]Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori preaches during the closing Eucharist of the 18th annual Global Episcopal Mission Conference. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceGEMN is a network of individuals, representatives of development organizations diocesan mission representative who are committed to sharing mission information and promoting mission. Ninety Episcopalians from North, Central and South America and the Caribbean gathered May 5-9 in Bogotá, Colombia, for the conference themed “Companions in Faith and Resources: Participating in God’s Mission.” The 2014 GEMN conference will take place in the Seattle, Washington, area May 29-June 1.In a departure from previous GEMN conferences, in addition to mission the Bogotá conference includes a focus on financial sustainability appropriate with it being held in Province IX, which in 2012 adopted self-sustainability as a focus.“North Americans like to support social and humanitarian programs, but if the churches are not self-sustaining they will not be able to work through the diocese on those programs,” said Bob Stevens, the outgoing executive director of the Dominican Development Group, during the start of a May 9 panel discussion on self-sustainability.Dominican Republic Bishop Julio Cesar Holguín, Honduras Bishop Lloyd Allen and Colombia Bishop Francisco Duque-Gómez, during a May 9 panel on self-sustainability. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceStevens moderated the discussion, which included Colombia Bishop Francisco Duque-Gómez, Honduras Bishop Lloyd Allen and Dominican Republic Bishop Julio Cesar Holguín, each of whom described their diocese’s efforts toward self-sustainability.“Dependency destroys human beings,” said Allen, who has set the year 2019 as the goal for his diocese’s independence from the Episcopal Church’s financial support. He has told his clergy and seminarians, “If we are going to change we all have to support self-sufficiency, each congregation, urban or rural, needs to have a microenterprise …  If you are not willing to support a self-sufficient project, this is not the place for you to be.”The 2012 General Convention allocated $1 million to guide the Province IX dioceses towards self-sufficiency. Currently only the Diocese of Puerto Rico, which operates a large hospital system, is self-sufficient.The Dominican Republic has set 2015 as its year to reach self-sufficiency, said Holguín, during his presentation, a goal that has been strengthened by the diocese’s partnership with the Dominican Development Group, which was established in 1998 to assist in the development and self-sufficiency of the diocese, one of the fastest growing dioceses in the Episcopal Church.“Ninety percent of the people in our parishes are poor and maybe 10 percent are middle or low class and one or two might be in a better financial situation,” said Holguín, adding that in a situation like this you need to be very entrepreneurial, though he said the church is educating members about the importance of tithing 10 percent of their income.To reach its goal, the Diocese of the Dominican Republic depends on partnerships with its 16 companion dioceses, parish, friends and other supporters.“They fall in love with the way we carry out the mission in our diocese,” he said.Since 1991, the Dominican Republic has decreased its dependence on the Episcopal Church from 84 to 18 percent, said Holguín, adding that support from the Dominican Development Group raised 60 percent of its $6 million endowment; the ultimate goal is to raise $7 million.“The church developed with a dependence… and it was harmful because they [the Episcopal Church] never asked us to achieve a goal,” said Holguín. “They gave us the fish every day but never taught us to fish.”In Colombia, the youngest diocese of the Episcopal Church, 90 percent of the priests are college-educated professionals who do not draw a salary from the diocese, and each parish has modest revenue that allows them to support, at a minimum, the infrastructure, said Duque-Gomez.In addition to Colombia, Honduras and the Dominican Republic, there are four more Province IX dioceses spread across the Caribbean and Central and northern South America. They are Venezuela, Puerto Rico, Ecuador Central and Ecuador Litoral, all of which were represented at the Bogotá conference.In 2010, the Episcopal Church informed the dioceses of Province IX that it was cutting their budgets by 32 percent. For Allen, he said, it was a “degrading” experience.“They didn’t ask us how we felt about that because we are dependent,” he said.GEMN itself was formed by a group of bishops during a time of contraction when the 1994 General Convention decided to cut the mission budget, said Gini Peterson, a GEMN board member from the Diocese of Atlanta.“I think the support and encouragement that are intangible is part of the greatest benefit of membership,” said Peterson.Holding the conference in Colombia served to strengthen the bonds between the dioceses of Province IX and the U.S.-based dioceses and parishes, said the Rev. Juan Carlos Restrop, who serves La Catedral De San Pablo in Bogotá.As for the Diocese of Colombia, which is beginning to see itself not as subordinate, but rather as moving toward self-sufficiency, it was important to host the conference and educate others about some of the diocese’s successes.Earlier in the conference, attendees were given the opportunity to experience some of the diocese’s ministries, all of which are supported by parishes.The 18th annual GEMN conference was the first ever attended by Rev. Canon Francisco Salazar of the Diocese of Venezuela. It served as a platform for dialogue on mission and for that reason exceeded his expectations, he said.Episcopal Church missionaries Heidi Schmidt and Monica Vega during a May 9 excursion to Mision de Santa Marta outside Bogotá. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceFor north Americans to travel to South America to see for themselves the resources of the Latin American churches is an important step in allowing for an open conversation on how north American missioners can help the church in Latin America develop those resources, said Salazar.“That is the strength of this conference,” he said.Laura Walta, director of global mission for the Diocese of Massachusetts, thought the GEMN conference set a context for mission and what it means to be involved in mission, and the discussions reinforced the notion of a changing approach.“The paradigm needs to shift from one of paternalism, charity and crisis,” she said. “People look at poverty like it can be fixed. They see material poverty and treat it with a North American approach. People need to learn about the whole person.”Mission should reflect, at the heart of it, Walta said, the vow Episcopalians take in the Baptismal Covenant: “ … to seek and serve Christ in all persons.”For Young Adult Service Corps missionary Nina Boe, who serves in the Anglican Episcopal Church of Brazil, the conference’s theme brought to mind a quote by Lilla Watson, an indigenous Australian woman: “If you have come to help me, you are wasting your time; but if you are here because your liberation is bound up with mine, then let us work together.”Much of mission and humanitarian aid still is approached in a patriarchal way, through donations and gifts, said Boe.“When people go out into the field they are changed and we are changed as well. In a healthy relationship, it goes both ways,” she said. “But are we willing to encounter God and the other in the field?”In addition to Boe, two other YASC missionaries and 14 Episcopal Church missionaries attended the GEMN Conference.Organizations like GEMN connect to the Episcopal Church’s Office of Global Partnerships because the office strives to coordinate its work with all the various organizations in support of mission across the church, said the Rev. David Copley, the Episcopal Church’s team leader for global partnerships and director of mission personnel.“GEMN is able to network on a grassroots level with parishes and dioceses and the church so they are a valuable resource,” he said.For the most part, the GEMN conference was held in Spanish, with simultaneous English interpretation, which for Sandra McPhee, chair of the Episcopal Church’s Standing Commission on World Mission, was something new and shifted a leadership role to Province IX.“It gives me great pleasure to see Province IX stepping up and being out front in leadership and claiming their proper place in the Episcopal Church.”— Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 last_img read more

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Video: International Anglican guests share joy at Curry’s installation

first_img Tags By Matthew DaviesPosted Nov 1, 2015 Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Rector Albany, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Pittsburgh, PA Video: International Anglican guests share joy at Curry’s installation Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curry Installation, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Anglican Communion, Rector Collierville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Video Rector Knoxville, TN last_img read more

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Reinventing St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in shopping center took ‘a…

first_img Richard Bidwell says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA January 6, 2017 at 10:36 am God bless St. Stephen’s and their new location! I worshipped with those good folks for a period in 2012-13 when they were in the wedding chapel. Most notable for me were two things: they prayed weekly for their brothers and sisters and Jack Iker who left for ACNA — but more powerfully, for the laying on of hands of each other during communion. I would often return to my pews with tears of gratitude after being fed, not only with the bless body and blood of Christ, but also with the care and concern of the family of God enacted, embodied, enabled. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA Comments (4) Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Fort Worth update Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ January 6, 2017 at 10:06 am Gives me hope for the future of our Church. Reinventing St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in shopping center took ‘a lot of miracles’ Press Release Service Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Josh Thomas says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Smithfield, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Katherine Rowe says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Collierville, TN Editor’s note: This is the third in a continuing series about the reinvention of the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth. Other stories in the series can be found here.[Episcopal News Service – Hurst, Texas] At first glance, Village Plaza looks like any other shopping center in the Fort Worth metro area – until you see that there’s not one but three  storefront churches. The newest, situated between Yori, an Asian fusion restaurant, and Thai Thip restaurant is St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church.The shopping center is the third place St. Stephen’s Episcopalians have called home since 2008. First, there was the local Women’s Club building and then the Northeast Wedding Chapel. Each place was limited by the cost of rent and when it was available. So, some members went looking for a new place and the idea of moving to a shopping center came up because, as Diane Snow put it, they thought such a location “might be appealing to non-traditional church goers.”The Episcopal Church Building Fund helped the congregation lease the space that had once housed a dance studio where one member’s daughter took classes years ago. “It was quite a risk in getting started here,” Snow said, explaining that the members wondered if it had enough room, and no one knew how long they would be there.They took the risk, gutting the space and turning it into a multipurpose sanctuary in 2014. And, while for most Episcopalians the image of a traditional church with stained glass windows and a big organ symbolizes the presence of the holy, the Rev. Bob Gross, a formerly retired priest who now serves the congregation, said, “I’ve felt the Holy Spirit here.”Others have, too, and newcomers have arrived. Some bring children and so the congregation offers Sunday school – in the kitchen right behind where the altar is current placed. It’s a good thing that Gross “has a nice booming voice,” said Rebecca McKneely, a member of St. Stephen’s since 1992.St. Stephen’s is finding ways to minister to the community outside of Sunday. It is one of the saints of the 4 Saints Food Pantry. The members also collect food for the Fort Worth AIDS Outreach Center and they regularly cook supper at the Ronald McDonald House of Fort Worth.The Little Free Library out front of St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Hurst, Texas, has become an unexpected outreach ministry. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceAnd then there’s their Little Free Library out front. It looks like a little traditional church, complete with painted stained glass windows, a red door and a “slate” roof. Beside it are two chairs and anyone is welcome to take a book from the small collection inside. Each book comes with a St. Stephen’s bookmark.The library has become an outreach effort in an unexpected way. One day a woman stopped by the library while shopping in the Village Plaza. She took a book back to the elderly woman for whom she works as a caregiver. Now the two women make a weekly trip to the library as one way for the older of the two to be outside of her house.The lesson from St. Stephen’s story for the rest of the Episcopal Church? “Anything is possible if you will think outside the norm instead of ‘we’ve always done it that way,’ ” says Gross. “Think of ways to do it differently and each location is going to be slightly different but there are people that need to be reached out to.”Snow, who joined St. Stephen’s in 1977, agreed. “From the very beginning, it has been extremely humbling to know what the early Christians experienced. All they had was each other and all we had was each other but we did have a lot of miracles happen along the way.”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Nikki Seger says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID January 6, 2017 at 2:43 pm My husband and I attended St Stephen’s last January while he was working in Fort Worth. What a breath of fresh air, to find folks who not only know that is God working right in the middle of everything but are jumping in to help, with both feet! Blessings to all whom you touch. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Comments are closed. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab January 5, 2017 at 6:48 pm Will be showing this video soon on The Daily Office. Thanks for the reporting, Ms. Schjonberg & ENS. To St. Stephen’s, Hurst: love your entryway! Very inviting, and the best front window I’ve seen of several nice storefront Episcopal churches. And that library… very cool. Sending prayers your way, and keep growing! Submit a Press Release Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jan 5, 2017 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israellast_img read more

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